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The old lady lay on the bed with her eyes wide open.

The old lady lay on the bed with her eyes wide opened.

Do both of the above sound right and mean about the same? Thanks.
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No. wide open is the adjective-- just like the shop is open / the shop is closed.

Mister MicawberNo. wide open is the adjective-- just like the shop is open / the shop is closed.

Thanks, Mister.

But I still have some doubt.

I think the following sound right:

The old lady lay on the bed and opened her eyes wide.

The old lady lay on the bed and her eyes were opened wide (by her.)

The old lady lay on the bed with her eyes wide opened.

And the last one is derived from the first two. So, I don't know why it's wrong.
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What's wrong is that the last two are not natural. Your 'derivations' are grammar games-- you are shuffling the structure and because the shuffling has been logical you expect all forms to be in use.

That's why I am here for you: We say her eyes were open / her eyes were closed.

Mister MicawberWhat's wrong is that the last two are not natural. Your 'derivations' are grammar games-- you are shuffling the structure and because the shuffling has been logical you expect all forms to be in use.

That's why I am here for you: We say her eyes were open / her eyes were closed.

Thanks, Mister, for your kindness and explanation.

That's why English is hard for us, who are far away from its environments and its people.
Mister MicawberNo. wide open is the adjective-- just like the shop is open / the shop is closed.

Hi guys,

"I don't want to open a new can of soup. Isn't there still some left in the opened can?" Could you use this to stress that it has been opened? Would this [past participle??] also be an adjective? Would we find it so "unnatural" as to prefer "the open can?"

Best wishes, - A.
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Avangi
Mister MicawberNo. wide open is the adjective-- just like the shop is open / the shop is closed.

Hi guys,

"I don't want to open a new can of soup. Isn't there still some left in the opened can?" Could you use this to stress that it has been opened? Would this [past participle??] also be an adjective?

Best wishes, - A.
Grammatically, of course, it works. But, as Mr. M. has been trying to convey, the adjectives we use in this case are 'open' and 'closed'. Just one of those things.