I have an instinctive feeling that the euphemism "the late" (referring to someone who's dead) implies that the death is a fairly recent occurrence. Is that correct? Or is it just my take on the expression?

=20
Bob
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I have an instinctive feeling that the euphemism "the late" (referring to someone who's dead) implies that the death is a fairly recent occurrence. Is that correct? Or is it just my take on the expression?

Well, it's normally used only when it's fairly recent. There is little point in saying the late Abraham Lincoln, because if you don't already know he's dead, you're too stupid to talk to.

Although it might be a clue that an Abe Lincoln other than the president is being talked about.
If you don't read the news one day, it's easy not to know that someone is dead.

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
I have an instinctive feeling that the euphemism "the late" ... correct? Or is it just my take on the expression?

Well, it's normally used only when it's fairly recent. =A0There is little point in saying the late Abraham Lincoln, because ... talk to. Although it might be a clue that an Abe Lincoln other than the president is being talked about.

"The late" does have a practical use. A man who is named John Jones, Jr. often drops the "Jr." upon the death of John Jones. So "John Jones and John Jones Jr." becomes "the late John Jones and John Jones".
GFH
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Well, it's normally used only when it's fairly recent.  There is little point in saying the late Abraham Lincoln, because if you don't already know he's dead, you're too stupid to talk to. Although it might be a clue that an Abe Lincoln other than the president is being talked about.

"The late" does have a practical use. A man who is named John Jones, Jr. often drops the "Jr." upon the death of John Jones. So "John Jones and John Jones Jr." becomes "the late John Jones and John Jones".

And does John Jones III become John Jones Jr?
Doesn't this cause loads of problems for mortgages, car loans, deeds, contracts, criminal charges, law suits, affidavits, witness testimony etc? For example, no one will know if an affidavit that refers to one of them uses the ranking at the time the affidavit was made, the name that the person making the statement was used all his life, was using at the time, who may not have known about the death of his father, or may not have felt such a death changed the other person's name, etc. ??
GFH

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
And does John Jones III become John Jones Jr?

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
You are Methusulah and I claim my 5 shekels

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I have an instinctive feeling that the euphemism "the late" ... correct? Or is it just my take on the expression?

Well, it's normally used only when it's fairly recent. There is little point in saying the late Abraham Lincoln, because ... talk to. Although it might be a clue that an Abe Lincoln other than the president is being talked about.[/nq]Do people actually name their kids like that? I mean, if someone is ignorant, I can understand. But if someone with the last name of Lincoln names their kid Abraham, it seems a bit pretentious if they're aware that one of the most commonly-known presidents had that name. It's not that I think Abraham Lincoln was a "great man"; I wasn't alive in that time to make that judgment for myself. I do see that the history books write about the man as if he was incapable of making mistakes, and people talk about him as if he should be revered.

I don't think the name should be trademarked or anything. I just know the perception of many seems to be that if your last name is Presley, you'd be best not to name your kid Elvis. Maybe I'm projecting my own view and assuming others share it.

Damaeus
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"The late" does have a practical use. A man who is named John Jones, Jr. often drops the "Jr." upon the death of John Jones. So "John Jones and John Jones Jr." becomes "the late John Jones and John Jones".

Often? Maybe they do sometimes, if they don't know any better. My name has been changed three times in my life, so far. I was born with one name, and it was changed when I was 2 years old and adopted into a family whose head of household made me a "Jr." of himself. I later changed my name to something of my own choosing since I thought his name sucked I didn't like any of them for myself. No offense to him. He likes his name. But had I kept the name my adoptive parents gave me, I would have never dropped the "Jr." off my name.
Damaeus
Well, it's normally used only when it's fairly recent. There ... Abe Lincoln other than the president is being talked about.

Do people actually name their kids like that? I mean, if someone is ignorant, I can understand. But if someone ... be best not to name your kid Elvis. Maybe I'm projecting my own view and assuming others share it. Damaeus

I've never come across anyone named Abe Lincoln, other than the famous one, and I'm not saying there are any. It was just an example.

But there are 1) people who are famous but not to everyone.
2) people who are famous after they are 20 or after they are 60, butchildren in other families are given the same name before the famous ones become famous.

Posters should say where they live, and for which area they are asking questions. I was born and then lived in Western Pa. 10 years
Indianapolis 7 years
Chicago 6 years
Brooklyn, NY 12 years
Baltimore 26 years
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But there are 1) people who are famous but not to everyone. 2) people who are famous after they are 20 or after they are 60, but children in other families are given the same name before the famous ones become famous.

Yeah, those I understand. There are many "Michael Jacksons" in the world, and some of them are even whiter than the famous one.

Damaeus
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