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I have lived here since 2001.

I have lived here for years.

If someone asked you the length of time that you have been living in the place wherer you dwell nowadays. You could say one of the above. What is the difference in the meaning between the two?

Of course they are synonymous. There should be a minute difference.
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Hmmm. They are not exactly synonymous.

'for years' is generally used to emphasise a great number of years, rather than just to indicate an unspecified number of years. I would not use it for just a 3 year period.

I can't say exactly how long, it is not a set rule, but I would think 10 or more.
Thanks nona

What is the difference between the two now? In fact, it was a mistake that I forgot write 4 years.

I have lived here since 2001.

I have lived here for 4 years.
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Supposing you continue to live there in the future, the first will remain true forever; the second will become false after a year.

Other than that, the difference is simply analogous to the difference in these:

Twenty is four more than sixteen.
Twenty is three less than twenty-three.

In other words what you have is two expressions which differ in words but not in meaning. I believe this is called "same reference with distinct senses".

Google -- sense reference -- to learn more about it.

CJ
Supposing you continue to live there in the future, the first will remain true forever; the second will become false after a year.


I don't understand what you mean, Jim. Could you explain, please?

[worked again!! Hot damn!!]
Next year it will be possible to say truthfully, "I have lived here since 2001".
Next year it will be necessary to change the second to "I have lived here for five years."

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Got it! Thanks, Jim.