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What do you think why autor used this tense ?


Do you think he has been interfering with those kids ? (The guys is now in jail, but he asked mr. Frost)


and


I always let them fight it out to the bitter end, then I arrest the winner. It means hiding round the corner utnil they've finished.

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What do you think why autor used this tense ?

Why do you think the author used this tense?


Do you think he has been interfering with those kids? (The guy guys is now in jail, but he asked Mr. Frost)


and


I always let them fight it out to the bitter end, and then I arrest the winner. It means hiding round the corner until utnil they've finished.



Which tense are you asking about? Note also that I've corrected a number of other errors in your writing.Clive
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Xenon02 Do you think he has been interfering with those kids?
... The guys guy is now in jail

Are you thinking that his being in jail means the present perfect continuous tense is wrong because he can't continue to interfere from jail?

That's a very small detail that is so close to present time that the speaker can ignore it because the speaker is more focused on the guy's recent behavior before going to jail. In any case, the answer to the question has current relevance, a mark of the present perfect.

Xenon02 I always let them fight it out to the bitter end, then I arrest the winner. It means hiding round the corner until they've finished.

Subordinating conjunctions of time (when, until, before, after, ...) can take either the simple tense or the perfect tense without much change of meaning.

If the main clause is in the present, the subordinate clause is in the present or the present perfect.
If the main clause is in the past, the subordinate clause is in the past or the past perfect.

It means hiding ... until they [finish / have finished].
It meant hiding ... until they [finished / had finished].

This example does not have the problem of deciding between the simple past and the present perfect.

CJ

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CliveWhich tense are you asking about?

Xenon02 is currently working to understand the choice between past simple and present perfect. He's going to be quoting passages (from a book he's reading) that don't make sense to him in terms of the choice of tense — something that I encouraged him to do in a previous thread.

CJ

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Ok so what do you think about this one?


Drink this. This is a medicine I blended. (he is holding a medicine)

I think present perfect suits here better than past simple (this part is actually from the movie, and I'm aware that they can have some grammar issue)

Xenon02 Drink this. This is a medicine I blended. (he is holding a medicine)I think present perfect suits here better than past simple

Yes. Either tense is acceptable. If you said it because you preferred present perfect, nobody would say you were wrong.

The speaker might be thinking in one of two ways:

1) This is a medicine that I have blended (for you on this occasion, and now I'm going to use it).
2) This is a medicine that I blended (which I do from time to time just to keep some on hand in case I need it).

CJ

2) This is a medicine that I blended (which I do from time to time just to keep some on hand in case I need it).

didn't think about this kind of explenation. Pretty interesting.


How about this example ? (from book, it seems they often use present perfect)'


"Good Lord, son. I've just realized. no wonder we've been so lucky. Do you know what today is? It's my birthday."

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Xenon02 I've just realized.

"just" with the present perfect is almost a formula of its own.

I have just PP / You have just PP / He has just PP / ...

where PP = past participle.

It is typically used with verb phrases that express an almost instantaneous event — events that don't take up a lot of time, like realize, win, die, arrive, leave.

Adding "just" means that the event took place only a very short time ago.

The plane has just landed.
You'll never guess who just walked in the door!
The Yankees have just won the world series again.


That said, many people (especially Americans, supposedly) use the simple past to express the same thought.

I just realized.

So you can use either one with "just" to report events that happened a very short time ago.

CJ

How about this ?


"Hello, Charlie- Jack. Of course my watch hasn't stopped. I'm still working and bloody hard, too. You done your crime statistics? Good, what was the trend, up or down? Seven per cent up? Here, did I tell you the joke about the bloke who drunk the spitton for a bet? "


I can understand "hasn't stopped" (because it still works now), but how about "here did I tell you the joke"


By the way, I think that some people uses the past simple to just say the past action, that isn't focusing on present. Like "They lost their friend !"- Even if it was not long time ago, it was just a past action, that happened. Maybe now something is going on about it. But nevermind about that, I'm more interested in the sentence above.


Cheers.

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