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1. get the kids ready for school- make the kids prepare to go to school

2. get breakfast ready- cook/make breakfast

3. take the kids to school- bring the kids to school

4. go for a run- go jogging

I understand these left phrases as the rights, but are they correct?

Is #1 sentence a causative verb?

About #2, is the word "ready" the adjective in here?

1). Can I push the seat "back"?

2). I'm afraid we don't have tickets "available".

Are these two sentences also adjectives?

Thank you very much.
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1. get the kids ready for school- prepare the kids to go to school

2. get breakfast ready- cook/make breakfast

3. take the kids to school- bring the kids to school

4. go for a run- go jogging

I understand these left phrases as the rights, but are they correct?-- As amended, yes.

Is #1 sentence a causative verb?-- No; causative verbs cause other verbs: I made the kids get ready for school.

About #2, is the word "ready" the adjective in here?- Yes

1). Can I push the seat "back"?- 'Back' is an adverb.

2). I'm afraid we don't have tickets "available".-- 'Available' is an adjective.
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Thank you so much for your answer!

I thought "ready" of "get the kids ready for school" is a verb.

Are "get the kids ready for school" and "make the kids get ready for school" different meanings?

I suppose them as follows, but are they correct?

get the kids ready for school-eg wake up, feed, help put clothes on the kids etc.

make the kids get ready for school- make the kids do like things above themselves

I see that "Back" is an adverb. Emotion: smile
get the kids ready for school-eg wake up, feed, help put clothes on the kids etc.

make the kids get ready for school- make the kids do like things above themselves

Right.
Are all of them right? Many thanks for your confirmation!
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