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Hi teachers

What exactly is the meaning of the following sentence?

We are not just selling cheap food but we also make sure the food is of good quality.

Thanks
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Comments  (Page 2) 
A form of "to be" followed by "of" and a noun is usually equivalent to "to be" followed by an adjective of similar meaning. It is an idiomatic use of an "of" phrase. Here are some other examples.

to be of use = to be useful
to be of help = to be helpful
to be of importance = to be important
to be of significance = to be significant
to be of consequence = to be consequential
to be of interest = to be interesting
to be of assistance = to be helpful (because there is no word "assistanceful")
to be of worth = to be valuable (because there is no word "worthful")
to be of good quality = to be good with respect to quality (because there is no word "good-quality-ful")

CJ
CJ

I have also seen some people use the following format

Please let me know if I can be any of help in this process.

So, what's the rule applied for this kind of "is of" thingy? Thanks.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
IhenryCJ

I have also seen some people use the following format

Please let me know if I can be any of help in this process.

So, what's the rule applied for this kind of "is of" thingy? Thanks.

I think CalifJim did a good job explaining the general rule applied to this grammatical consrtruction.

I would add one thing though. The noun in question is usually an abstract one because 'of + noun' can be used to say that
someone or something has a particular quality.

be + of + noun (abstract) ---> equivalent to its adjective form
IhenryCJ

I have also seen some people use the following format

Please let me know if I can be any of help in this process.

So, what's the rule applied for this kind of "is of" thingy? Thanks.

The correct phase is: Please let me know if I can be of any help in this process
Ihenry,

Yes, as mentioned above, it's be of any help, not be any of help. Between of and the following abstract noun you can place a modifier (any, no, good, ...). We've already seen to be of good quality where good is added to to be of quality. There's another expression with good: to be of good cheer = to be cheerful. And, of course, you can form be of no help, be of any help, be of any assistance and many others like these.

CJ
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
"is of" can probably mean "has". but mostly the following complement must be an abstract noun.
Eg. many scholars are of different ideas. (many scholars have different ideas).
but we cannot use like this "Jame is of a car." because a car is not an abstract noun.
I'm not sure and i'm not good at english but someone told me : is of good quality = from good quality things.
If it looks ediot, U can reprimand to me.
Hello,

Thanks for your detailed instruction.
I made a sentence about "is of" but I'm not sure if it's correct.
Could you please check the sentence for me?

"completing our own philosophies is of vital errand of life."

Rex
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Anonymousis of vital errand of life
This phrase is impossible, but you can have "is of vital importance in life".

CJ
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