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What is the meaning of (sic) after a quotation in an article?
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It is used after a word or phrase that seems to be wrongly spelled or not accurate, in order to show that it was quoted accurately.
The sign said 'Skool (sic) starts at 9am.'
The (sic) shows that the word 'skool' is incorrectly spelled and you don't want anyone to think that you spelled it wrongly.
And 'sic' is a Latin word, an adverb. It means 'like that' , 'in that way'
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its simple abbrev for said in context......

D athr of the article knows the mistake he has done but publishes it anyway.... . (sic) Emotion: big smile

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Anonymousathr of the article knows the mistake he has done but publishes it anyway.... . (sic)
I disagree.
The author does not consider it a mistake, but fears that others may. He wishes to assure the reader that he wrote this advisedly, or intentionally.

Best regards, - A.
Dear Elena,

The word you're referring to is not 'sic' but 'viz'.

Regards,

Ph.D
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ElenaAnd 'sic' is a Latin word, an adverb. It means 'like that' , 'in that way'
AnonymousDear Elena,

The word you're referring to is not 'sic' but 'viz'.
Elena's statement is not incorrect, although "sic" is often translated as "thus."
"Vis" is not a Latin word, but a contraction of "videre licet."

It's true that "viz" and "sic" may be used interchangeably in certain cases.
'Backronyms' (created to fit the word, but not creating the word) such as "spelling is correct", "same in copy", "spelling intentionally conserved", "said in context", or "sans intention comique" (French: without comic intent) etc. are all FALSE etymologies. Nor is sic a shortened form of 'Sicunt'. Sic is indeed a Latin word meaning "thus", "so", "as such", or "just as that". The usage discussed above is, however, correct.