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Below sentences are from the book "How to stop worrying and start living," and the underlined part I cannot understand.

One thing is certain: this book is practical. You can set your teeth in it. "Science," said the French philosopher Valéry, "is a collection of successful recipes."

So I looked up the dictionary, but there's only 'set your teeth on edge,' not 'set your teeth in it.'

▸set your teeth on edge
◊If a sound, taste, etc., sets your teeth on edge, it makes your body feel tense or uncomfortable.
▪ That awful squeaking is enough to set my teeth on edge!

Besides, the two expressions seems quite different in contextual sense.
Help me.
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'Set your teeth in it' is intended to mean 'put it to good use, find much of value in it'. But it is a botched expression. The correct expression is '[url=http://www.answers.com/topic/sink-one-s-teeth-into ]get/sink one's teeth into (something)[/url]'.