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I made a booking at a hotel. I sent the hotel an email to re-confirm my booking and I also asked them for a non-smoking room with an additional bed as a request.
The reply I received from them says "Your reservation has been confirmed and fully addresses your specified preferences."
I don't understand the meaning of the word "address" in this context.
Is that a nature way of using the word?
Could you please rephrase it for me to understand?

Thank you.
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http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/address?s=t
15: to deal with or discuss: to address the issues.

Yes, it's a common usage of the verb address.

"Your reservation shows that your preferences will be taken care of."
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Thank you! Now I can understand completely.
To address something can mean, writing an address on an envelope or, it could mean giving attention to something, responding to something.

For example:

If you feel sick, you go to see a doctor. The doctor will listen to you describe your symptoms and, if necessary, will prescribe some medication for you. But, if you then say to the doctor that you don't like taking medication, or you were worried about taking this particular medication, the doctor would, and should, "address" (respond to) your concerns. He might say something to the effect of "Ok, I understand your concerns, but don't worry, the medication isn't strong, it shouldn't make you feel drowsy and it doesn't cause any illness.But if you do experience any problems, then come back to me".

You are concerned and the doctor "addresses" your concerns. He responds to your concerns is another way to say it.

As regards your question about it being a natural way to use the word, I am inclined to say no, given the context, It's overly formal, when a warmer response would have been better. In fact, it's more than overly formal, it's a contrived attempt at trying to sound formal (in my humblest of opinions), when simple language would have probably worked better. As someone who has management experience, if I were to read that email, I would not be happy. I would be sitting down with the author and teaching them how to write in such a way that conveys warmth and welcome and makes the customer "feel the love" before they've even set foot in the foyer.

Your english is pretty good, maybe you'd like to have a try at re-phrasing it again yourself, see what you can come up with.

Well, I hope this helps and you feel I've "fully addressed" your query. I also hope this hotel's customer service, is better than their language skills, and that you have an enjoyable stay. If not, make sure to let management know. One (genuine, and I stress genuine) complaint is more valuable to a customer-centric business than 10 compliments. Emotion: smile)
@Mrs Doyle,

Thank you for your answer.
The definition "giving attention to something" gave me a deeper understanding of the word.
Your explation and opinion about custmer service also helps me realize what's important in
conveying messages to readers.
As you recommended, I tried to re-phrase that sentence as follows.
"We have confrimed your reservation and we are also happy to reserve a room which meets your preferences.
We look forward to welcoming you soon."Emotion: embarrassed
Mrs DoyleTo address something can mean, writing an address on an envelope or, it could mean giving attention to something, responding to something. For example:If you feel sick, you go to see a doctor. The doctor will listen to you describe your symptoms and, if necessary, will prescribe some medication for you. But, if you then say to the doctor that you don't like taking medication, or you were worried about taking this particular medication, the doctor would, and should, "address" (respond to) your concerns. He might say something to the effect of "Ok, I understand your concerns, but don't worry, the medication isn't strong, it shouldn't make you feel drowsy and it doesn't cause any illness.But if you do experience any problems, then come back to me". You are concerned and the doctor "addresses" your concerns. He responds to your concerns is another way to say it. As regards your question about it being a natural way to use the word, I am inclined to say no, given the context, It's overly formal, when a warmer response would have been better. In fact, it's more than overly formal, it's a contrived attempt at trying to sound formal (in my humblest of opinions), when simple language would have probably worked better. As someone who has management experience, if I were to read that email, I would not be happy. I would be sitting down with the author and teaching them how to write in such a way that conveys warmth and welcome and makes the customer "feel the love" before they've even set foot in the foyer.Your english is pretty good, maybe you'd like to have a try at re-phrasing it again yourself, see what you can come up with.Well, I hope this helps and you feel I've "fully addressed" your query. I also hope this hotel's customer service, is better than their language skills, and that you have an enjoyable stay. If not, make sure to let management know. One (genuine, and I stress genuine) complaint is more valuable to a customer-centric business than 10 compliments. )
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Glad I could help moguwa Emotion: smile