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Hello, teachers!


May I ask some questions about the meanings of the underlined sentences in the paragraph below?
I appreciate your help in advance. Thank you a lot for your time and consideration.


[Paragraph]

The second patient was an 85-year-old lady whose hair caught fire while she was smoking.
She arrived with a deep burn; I knew it would surely be fatal.
As remarkable coincidence, there was a seminar going on at the time in medical ethics,
given by the wife of an official of our university.
She asked me if I had any sort of ethical problem I could bring up for discussion.
I described the case and asked the students their opinion.
After the discussion, I made a remark that was, in retrospect, a serious mistake.
I said, “ I’ll take the word back to the nurses about her,
and we will talk about it some more before we decide.”
The instructor and the students were shocked: “You mean this is a real patient?”
The teacher of ethics was not accustomed to being challenged by reality.
In any event, I went back and met with the nurses.
A day or two later, when she was making no progress and was suffering terribly,

we began to back off treatment.
When she complained of pain, we gave her plenty of morphine. A great plenty.
Soon She died quietly and not in.
As a reasonable physician, you had better move ahead and do what you would want done for you.
And don’t discuss it with the world first. There is a lesson here for everybody.
Assisting people to leave this life requires strong judgement and long experience to avoid its misuse.


#1

'After the discussion, I made a remark that was, in retrospect, a serious mistake.
I said, “ I’ll take the word back to the nurses about her,
and we will talk about it some more before we decide.”'


[Question]
When the writer looked back at the past situation at the seminar,
why does he think that the remark that he made a serious mistake?


#2

'“ I’ll take the word back to the nurses about her,
and we will talk about it some more before we decide.'


[Question]
This question is closely related to the question 1.
What does 'the word' and 'it' refer to in the sentence?
What will they decide to do after they talk about it some more?
What does the sentence above exactly mean?


#3

'The instructor and the students were shocked: “You mean this is a real patient?”
The teacher of ethics was not accustomed to being challenged by reality. '


[Question]
What does the phrase 'being challenged by reality' mean?



#4

'As a reasonable physician, you had better move ahead and do what you would want done for you.
And don’t discuss it with the world first.'


[Question]
This question is also connected to question 1 and 2.
What does the phrase 'move ahead' mean?
What does the phrase 'do what you would want done for you' mean?
Why does he suggest that a reasonable physican should 'not discuss it with the world first'?
What does 'the world' refer to in the sentence?
Does 'the world' refer to such seminars where he once made a remark that was a serious mistake?

+1

We prefer that you try to answer first, and then show us your answers for our comments.


A couple of quick queries.

Are you convinced that you had the right to make this decision?

Didn't this poor woman have any relatives available for consultation?

+1

'After the discussion, I made a remark that was, in retrospect, a serious mistake.
I said, “ I’ll take the word back to the nurses about her,
and we will talk about it some more before we decide.”'


What does 'the word about her' mean? I think the writer means 'what was said in these discussions', but i don't find it a very clear or natural expression here'.

I don't like the way the writer seems to simply assume that he and the nurses have the God-like right to make this decision.

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Comments  

Dear Clive,


Sorry for too many questions at a time.

And thank you for your advice.

I'll make my questions short this time.


(P.S.) For your queries, I believe every human being including doctors must not give up life at any case.

And I can't get any information from the passage if the woman had other relatives for consultation.


[My question]


'After the discussion, I made a remark that was, in retrospect, a serious mistake.
I said, “ I’ll take the word back to the nurses about her,
and we will talk about it some more before we decide.”'


What does 'the word about her' mean?

That must be the key to my other questions.

 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
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