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A women who has just had an operation is surprised and happy she isn't in any pain.

She says: "I thought for sure I'd be in a lot more pain and would find it difficult doing things but today I have been washing dishes, folding some clothes, playing with my little 3yo on the floor ".

Is she talking about the nature of her activities or is she talking about repeated activities? I think she is talking about the nature of her activities. What do you think?
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olive file 673I think she is talking about the nature of her activities

She is talking about the individual activities, repeated or not. She got off on the "-ing" foot with "doing" and just just kept on with it. She might have said "difficult to do things, but today I washed dishes, folded some clothes …" with the same meaning.

what do you mean by "she got off on the -ing foot"? What does that mean?

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olive file 673what do you mean by "she got off on the -ing foot"? What does that mean?

Sorry about that. There is an expression "to get off on the wrong foot" meaning to begin something badly. I made a little joke on that.

To answer your question, when I first read what she said, I thought that I would have used the infinitive instead of the participle ending in "-ing" with "find it", "find it difficult to do things" instead of "find it difficult doing things". What she said is not wrong, but I suspect that once she had used "doing", she was more inclined to use "washing", "folding" and "playing", and that took her into the present perfect continuous when it was unnecessary but again not wrong at all.