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If it's good enough for the folks at Oxford UP, why does it not appear more on this, linguistics, website?

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The term 'spoken grammar' is used to describe features of English that are common in the informal or conversational language, but normally absent from conventional grammar syllabuses.

http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/try/uk-publishers/oup/introducing-your-students-spoken-grammar
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I suppose we are just not worthy, old chap.

MrP
Or not equipped.
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Well, I'm sure we don't always get all the wine into the glass; but the forum is free, and attractively illustrated.

MrP
Hi Anon

You're opening a big can of worms here. This website is global and, as such, is not a Standard English devoted site. In fact, most of the users of this site seem to use American English. As an English teacher, born in England and working from England, I can find this peculiar. Some people take great offense when I give an alternative answer based on Standard English.

With regard to spoken grammar, as known to the Oxford folk, it can be very difficult to teach. The first reason for this is that many people learn English in order to obtain a qualification at the end of the course. As suc, these people are taught the formal forms, which are standardised. The examiners expect a certain response and teachers have to teach this response for their pupils to succeed. The second reason is the great variety in spoken English. Although the UK is a very small country with a moderate sized population, the local variences in dialect, phraseology and grammar are massive.

For example, I was born and raised in Lancashire, where we use the phrase 'Put th'wood inth' ole' which is the dialectic way of saying 'Put the wood in the hole' or more simply - 'close the door'. Nowhere else in the UK would nyone say this, or even understand it. Likewise, in Newcastle, the Geordies (as they are known) might say 'Howay, that's canny lush, man' which means 'that's wonderful/lovely'. Newcastle is only 70 miles from Lancashire, yet such a different English is spoken. With this sort of variety in the UK, imagine how much variety there must be across the USA, and Canada, and Australia/New Zealand etc.

Overall, for most English learners, this would be very confusing and could damage their English learning. This type of English study is best learnt by experience, rather than study, and is probably only for very advanced students. I note that your English is superb, so you would be suitable for such learning. As you are, no doubt, aware, I have witten this response in 'pure' English, which would be understood by English (whether Standard or American) across the world. However, just for you, here is a little more conversational style, as you might hear in Manchester.

"Ye, what's doing? Are we sorted for Saturdays match, like? Should be reet gradely!"

And with that, I'm off to Rochdale for our last game of the football season. We'll be in the play-offs and hopefully a trip to Wembley and promotion.

Good luck, and you might like to watch some regionally based movies (Trainspotting, Twin Town, Billy Liar) to hear more spoken grammar.
Thank your for that, Adrenochrome. Much to think on there.

Good luck in the play-offs.

Best wishes,

MrP
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AnonymousIf it's good enough for the folks at Oxford UP, why does it not appear more on this, linguistics, website?
Because it's useless. Normal people just call it "spoken English", and that's it. I think talking about "registers" might be much more useful than inventing other grammars.
Authentic speech in any language is immeasurably tedious, when examined in a faithful transcription, or on a recording. Only a very few people would find it engaging, after an hour or so of initial curiosity. And you have to read vast amounts of it, to extract tiny amounts of information. There are better things to do with your time.

Besides, one of the great pleasures of talking with fluent non-native speakers is the economy and grammaticality of their speech. It would be a pity if they began to prefer vapid burble, like the natives.

MrP
Kooyeen
AnonymousIf it's good enough for the folks at Oxford UP, why does it not appear more on this, linguistics, website?

Because it's useless. Normal people just call it "spoken English", and that's it. I think talking about "registers" might be much more useful than inventing other grammars.

How can one invent what's already there?

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