+0
"I was not very pleased with the room, so decided to seek another one the next day. "
"I worked until the due date when I had my son. I gave a birth to him on the next day."

In which case should I need 'on' before 'the next day'?
I mean, I don't understand when I can omit 'on' before the phrase 'the next day.'

In the following sentece, is it incorrect if I omit 'on'?
"If you place an order after our hours of operation, it will be processed on the next day. "

Many thanks for your help in advance.
1 2 3 4 5 6
Comments  (Page 3) 
Maybe:

"I gave up work six months before my daughter was born. But I worked until the due date when I had my son. I gave birth to him next day."

Abbie has explained it already; but to confirm what I meant:

'When I had my son' can mean either:

1. 'when I gave birth to my son'

or, loosely, in contexts like this one:

2. 'during the period which consisted of pregnancy + giving birth + recuperation'.

In the blue box above, I meant #2.

Sorry about the confusion! I should have explained...

MrP
To senthivelann,

Re: Does "when I had my son" not refer to that the baby was still in her womb?

In the following sentence, please tell me, does it states that "her son" was already born or does it state that "her son" was still in her womb??

"I HAD a son when I was only eighteen."
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I HAD a son when I was only eighteen."


In this sentence, the child was born when the woman was 18. She may have been 17 0r 18 during her pregnancy.

English can be confusing at times, because we one word may have several different meanings, and it depends entirely upon context. Mr. P has given several different examples of the use of "when I had my son". Just by looking at those few words, we cannot really be definitive about its exact meaning, because we need the whole context.

Sorry about that! Emotion: sad All part of the great learning experience!

(Conversely, I believe that in Chinese, there are several words which can describe one thing - is that not so, Chinese speakers?)
To Temico,

I agree with Abbie1948.

msn
I really appreciate your comments on the sentence I had shown here as an example. Emotion: smile
I worked until the due date when I had my son. I gave a birth to him on the next day.


Actually it was shown as an example how to use 'next day' in a dictionary. So.... there's no context at all.
According to the translation it has in the dictionary, it means;
- I worked until the expected date of confinement during my pregnancy. Then, I gave him a birth on the next day.

With this translation, I thought;
- a person didn't give a birth to her baby on the due date(the expedted date of confinement).

English can be confusing at times, because we one word may have several different meanings, and it depends entirely upon context.

I agree!! It's really confusing and I'm often puzzled...it's sometimes very difficult for me to find out what one English expression(a word/a phrase) really means in the sentence.
(especially when someone makes an ironical comment!)

Not only English....I think one word/phrase can have some different meanings in most of the languages.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
To abbie,

If we are going to accept "I had a son." to mean "I was pregnant with a son.", then we might as well accept it to mean "I adopted a son." e.g.

"I had a son when I was 50 years old." = "I adopted a son when I was 50 years old( since obviously, she couldn't have given birth to one at that age."

Also, I would like to point out that Caesarean births( which are common these days) are performed on their "due dates". These dates are the birthdays of babies born this way.
I woudn't be that sure about the limit age for giving birth, temico... in Italy, I think a woman of about 60 gave birth to a baby some months ago...

PS sorry for thetypos but my PC seems to be swallowing letters
We could debate this, split hairs and count angels for ever.

I have never met a native English speaker who would say "I had my son ..." meaning they had adopted a son.
Also, I would like to point out that Caesarean births( which are common these days) are performed on their "due dates". These dates are the birthdays of babies born this way.


Not all C-sections are performed on the due date, though the majority of elective sections may be. Approx. 20% of pregnant women undergo c-section, and in US approx. 50% of these are unnecessary.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
To pieanne,

You know as well as I do that that is not the point I was trying to make. Anyhow, please be kind enough to consider it a typo and read "50" in my sentence as "65". Thanks.
Show more