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"I was not very pleased with the room, so decided to seek another one the next day. "
"I worked until the due date when I had my son. I gave a birth to him on the next day."

In which case should I need 'on' before 'the next day'?
I mean, I don't understand when I can omit 'on' before the phrase 'the next day.'

In the following sentece, is it incorrect if I omit 'on'?
"If you place an order after our hours of operation, it will be processed on the next day. "

Many thanks for your help in advance.
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Comments  (Page 4) 
Well Abbie, I also, have never met a native English speaker who would say "I had a son...." to mean "I was pregnant with a son....", despite the fact that I speak with them almost daily.

Re: "....though the majority of elective sections may be."

You remind me of those who resorts to the number of hits on "Google searches" to prove that the "majority" accepts this but not that!
Keep it good-humoured. No personal comments.

I dislike having to delete posts.

MrP
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You remind me of those who resorts to the number of hits on "Google searches" to prove that the "majority" accepts this but not that!


Well, Temico, everybody has to know something of their own knowledge! Emotion: geeked Sometimes one just knows something without need to resort to google, however I can provide you with references if you wish. Emotion: smile

I think we may be getting little confused between "I had my son" and "when
"I had my son in Queen mary's hospital"


My son was born in Queen Mary's Hospital.
"When I had my son in Queen Mary's Hospital ..."


During the time of my confinement, both before and after the delivery of my son in Queen Mary's Hospital ...

Anyway, is it really worth getting so hung up on?

I did read a comment somewhere on another forum refering to native speakers' use of English to the effect that "It's their language, and they can do what they like with it"

Do you think that's true?
You remind me of those who resorts to the number of hits on "Google searches" to prove that the "majority" accepts this but not that!


Well, Temico, everybody has to know something of their own knowledge! Emotion: geeked Sometimes one just knows something without need to resort to google, however I can provide you with references if you wish. Emotion: smile

I think we may be getting little confused between "I had my son" and "when I had my son".
"I had my son in Queen mary's hospital"


My son was born in Queen Mary's Hospital.
"When I had my son in Queen Mary's Hospital ..."


During the time of my confinement, both before and after the delivery of my son in Queen Mary's Hospital ...

Anyway, is it really worth getting so hung up on?

I did read a comment somewhere on another forum refering to native speakers' use of English to the effect that "It's their language, and they can do what they like with it"

Do you think that's true?
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Honestly, Temico - you are so funny! You really make me laugh! Emotion: big smile You remind me of my father-in-law. If anything happens to him, it's "an accident", if the same thing happens to me it's "carelessness"!Emotion: big smile
Abbie,

"When I had my son in Queen Mary's Hospital ..." = "When a son was born to me in Queen Mary's Hospital...." ( that is what it means to me, anyway.)

I also read in a forum somewhere that there is an English( I mean from England) saying which goes like this, "English was born in England, got sick in America, died in India and is now being dismembered and cremated all over the world." I wonder how far this is true.
Honestly, Abbie, I'd rather make you laugh than cry. I am only a student with a very limited budget and can't afford that many boxes of tissues!
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Language is dynamic, so who is qualified to give a definitive answer? [:^)]
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