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"I was not very pleased with the room, so decided to seek another one the next day. "
"I worked until the due date when I had my son. I gave a birth to him on the next day."

In which case should I need 'on' before 'the next day'?
I mean, I don't understand when I can omit 'on' before the phrase 'the next day.'

In the following sentece, is it incorrect if I omit 'on'?
"If you place an order after our hours of operation, it will be processed on the next day. "

Many thanks for your help in advance.
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Comments  (Page 5) 
Abbie,
I read somewhere that there is an institute(or whatever) in France which checks on any new word additions and/or usage of the French language and is legally authorised to judge and approve/disapprove of them to be used in schools, official correspondence, etc.. This institute's ruling is considered binding.

I wonder why they don't have a similar "check" system in England, home and birthplace of the English language??
Yes, there is such an institution in France.

English is spoken so widely and variously across the world, it would be impossible to "police". Anyway, who is to say which is better, AmE or BrE?

English has always been a hotchpotch of words picked up from various other languages, so the addition of a few more probably won't hurt!
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Where do you study, Temico?
Re: Anyway, who is to say which is better, AmE or BrE?

You remind me of the film, "My fair lady" in which Professor Higgins(?) said something like, "Americans have stopped speaking English ages go."

Anyhow, if think that "the addition of a few more probably won't hurt! ", I'd presume that you have a fancy for PATCHWORK!

I also wonder what is the purpose behind the trend these days, in America and other parts of the world, to preserve tribal/aboriginal culture and revive dying languages? For making future Hollywood films look more authentic, perhaps??
In a dump somewhere, Abbie. Just to keep you smiling, I am not studying English.Emotion: big smile
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Two nations divided by a common language

(I can't remember who said that, sorry)

English already is a patchwork. We have words from all the people who have invaded or conquered these islands over the centuries.

I think that aboriginal people themselves want to be recognised, after so many years of oppression and destruction of their culture and way of life. Language is a central and essential part of the culture, so revival of language must go hand in hand with revival/preservation of culture.
Abbie, you are forgetting the fact that the British(or English if you like) conquered and colonised two-thirds of the world and forced the use of their language on their subjects. Some of these countries have totally lost/forgotten their native languages and are now known as Anglo-phone countries. Even in India where there are more than 200 native languages, it is very rare to find an Indian person who can utter a few sentences in his own native tongue without adding a few "English" words/sentences in between. (I put the word English between quotation marks because of the funny/unusual pronunciation). Some of these countries want their languages back in use, I wonder why?

Re: I think that aboriginal people themselves want to be recognised, after so many years of oppression and destruction of their culture and way of life. Language is a central and essential part of the culture, so revival of language must go hand in hand with revival/preservation of culture.

Don't you find it ironical that aborignal people would want to revive and preserve their language as it was ages ago while the English would not mind their language becoming a patchwork of bits and pieces from here and there??
Abbie, you are forgetting the fact that the British(or English if you like) conquered and colonised two-thirds of the world


I assure you, Temico, I am not forgetting that. It doesn't mean I have to be proud of it!
it is very rare to find an Indian person who can utter a few sentences in his own native tongue without adding a few "English" words/sentences in between.


Some things are simply not translatable into another language. I wonder if "computer" is translatable. We all add new words to our language all the time, to cope with new developments. email;blog, etc.

It is impossible to find an English person who can utter even one sentence without incorporating a bit of Frisian, Danish, Saxon or Norman. Not to mention all the Indian words we have incorporated into the language.

The unification of the English language really only started after the development of printing, and the decision to "standardise" English (which I think was around 16th - 17th C, but Paco will help me out on this one. Certainly in the time of Shakespeare, language use varied considerably throughout the country. this is how we know that Shakespeare wrote the plays, and not bacon, because the language is from a Midland root, and not a SE English root.

Do you know the meaning of the English words "chop-chop"?
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By the way, none of the above should be taken to mean that I don't care about English; I care v. much!
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