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"I was not very pleased with the room, so decided to seek another one the next day. "
"I worked until the due date when I had my son. I gave a birth to him on the next day."

In which case should I need 'on' before 'the next day'?
I mean, I don't understand when I can omit 'on' before the phrase 'the next day.'

In the following sentece, is it incorrect if I omit 'on'?
"If you place an order after our hours of operation, it will be processed on the next day. "

Many thanks for your help in advance.
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Comments  
You may include or omit "on" whenever you wish in that expression.
In depends on your mood at the time, I suppose! Emotion: smile

CJ
Hi CalifJim,

Thank you very much for answering my question.

So, there's no special rules! Emotion: big smile
I can just include or omit 'on' whenever I'd like to - (This is great...!!Now I don't have to worry about it!!)

Many thanks again for your help.

Candy
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I have no intention to oppose CJ's reply. However, as long as I studied, omission of 'on' (i.e., adverbial accusative construct) seems more common at least in written documents.

OED contains 381 quotes using 'next day'. 'On the next day' is contained in 11 quotes and 'on next day' is only one. Other quotes use mostly either simple 'next day' or 'the next day' (the ratio of the former to the latter is about 3:7).

The number of Google's hits is;
on next day 59,600, on the next day 429,000, next day 2,280,000, the next day 8,885,000

paco
To candy,

Re: "I worked until the due date when I had my son. I gave a birth to him on the next day."

There is something "illogical" in your above sentences because they contradict each other. I hope you are aware of it.
"I worked until the due date when I had my son. I gave a birth to him on the next day."


An easy mistake to make.

It should be "I worked until my due date, and gave birth to my son the next day."
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I think in some cultures until 'x' date means up to and including the day preceeding the given date.
I think that Japanese is one such culture isn't it Temico?

Could it also be; 'I worked until the day (before?) my son was due, and gave birth the next day (as expected)' ?
I was reading it to mean "the expected date of delivery" as in medical-speak.
Maybe:

"I gave up work six months before my daughter was born. But I worked until the due date when I had my son. I gave birth to him next day."

MrP
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