+0
Did you tell Megan the details of the Information Day? If not, I will tell her.

1) Should you add "the details" to the rear of the last sentence if you want to make it natural?

--- "If not, I will tell her the details." 'Tell' normally takes the direct and indirect objects, and I wonder if in this case you need the direct object. My gut feeling and experience tells me --- and I would normally just say so --- you don't need it here.

2) Could we drop 'the' off of 'the details'? I feel there is a difference here; just 'detail of ...' would make you feel the details 'you' might have given were not all the details you need for the Day.

Thanks in advance for your help,

Hiro
1 2
Comments  
HSSMy gut feeling and experience tells me --- and I would normally just say so --- you don't need it here.
You can safely listen to your gut on this one! I will tell her is enough. You don't need to repeat what you already said.
HSSCould we drop 'the' off of 'the details'?
Hmm. If you did that, you would want to add any. Did you tell Megan any details?

CJ
CalifJimHmm. If you did that, you would want to add any. Did you tell Megan any details?

And does "Did you tell Megan any details of the Information Day" stand natural as well?

Hiro
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Since your original question was about the objects of tell, I didn't focus much on the rest of the sentence.

As it turns out, that last part doesn't sound natural to me. I would have said

Did you tell Megan any details about Information Day?

(I don't know what you intend to convey by "Information Day", but since you capitalized it, I assume it's some sort of special day that is observed regularly in your area.)

CJ
Thanks, CJ, as always. The Information Day --- actually I made it up. I was thinking of a day when highschool students visit your college, are given a campus tour, are provided information on it, and have a chance to ask you questions. It may sound better if you call it the open campus.
HSSI was thinking of a day when highschool students visit your college, are given a campus tour, ...
OK. Then it's a proper noun, and would not take an article. No the.

Here are some examples of other special days in the American calendar that have the word Day at the end. No article.

... details about Groundhog Day.
... details about New Year's Day.
... details about Memorial Day.
... details about Labor Day.
... details about Mother's Day.

CJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hi CalifJim,

I'm sorry if I interrupted here. I have struggled over the use "detail of" and "detail on/about"

Could I ask why "detals of Information Day" is not used but "details about Information Day"?

Thank you.

Tinanam
tinanam0102Could I ask why "detals of Information Day" is not used
The combination "details of" is used very frequently. And so is "details about".

I suppose it was the verb tell that governed my choice in this case. We tell people about things, so the presence of tell influenced me to choose about.

CJ
Dear CalifJim,

Thank you for the explanation.

I found two sentences on internet with combinations: "details of" and "detail on". I suppose "detail on" mean almost the same as "detail about". Would you please tell me how they differ, and how should we be governed in our choice in cases like these?

1. A statement from the family did not give details of the precise cause of death. (Would "on" or "about" justified here?)

2. The statement did not give details on the cause of death for John. (Would "of" work here?)

3. Would you say, "Details on / of the furneral are not available"?

Thank you.

Tinanam
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more