+0
When I saw the job advertisement, it was already too late to apply for.

This is the pen that I used to write with.

I know most native speakers think "for" is optional, but how about "with" in the second sentense? Is it optional? If not, why not? Thanks.
+0
It seems optional to me. "This is the pen that I used to write [my magnum opus, 'The Seeds of the Father']"

+0
AngliholicWhen I saw the job advertisement, it was already too late to apply for.

This is the pen that I used to write with.

I know most native speakers think "for" is optional, but how about "with" in the second sentense? Is it optional? If not, why not? Thanks.

Hi Angliholic

In your first sentence, I'd say that 'for' would only be appropriate in informal English. In informal English we would know that the person means to say "apply for the job". However, as your sentence is written, it technically means "apply for the advertisement".

Your second sentence is interesting in that it is not actually 100% clear whether you mean:
[used to]+[write]
or

[used]+[to write].
Emotion: surprise
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Comments  
Thanks, Mister Micawber.
 Yankee's reply was promoted to an answer.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Yankee
AngliholicWhen I saw the job advertisement, it was already too late to apply for.

This is the pen that I used to write with.

I know most native speakers think "for" is optional, but how about "with" in the second sentense? Is it optional? If not, why not? Thanks.

Hi Angliholic

In your first sentence, I'd say that 'for' would only be appropriate in informal English. In informal English we would know that the person means to say "apply for the job". However, as your sentence is written, it technically means "apply for the advertisement".

Your second sentence is interesting in that it is not actually 100% clear whether you mean:
[used to]+[write]
or

[used]+[to write].
Emotion: surprise

Thanks, Yankee, for the reminder.

I think I get it now.