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By a Times Staff Writer
June 26, 2008

HARARE, ZIMBABWE -- Former South African leader Nelson Mandela on Wednesday joined a growing chorus of African officials criticizing Zimbabwe's leadership, further shaking longtime President Robert Mugabe's grip on power.


This is from Los Angeles Times. My question is can "on" before Wednesday be dropped? I put this qestion because I often come across dates and days without "on" before them, especially in news articles. When should I use "on" before a date or a day and when I should not? I am really confused.
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The preposition is indeed sometimes dropped before the days of the week in newspapers: He will arrive in Cairo [on] Wednesday. The resultant Wednesday becomes what in some other languages is called an accusative of time. Dropping the preposition is also fairly common in informal style, which has led some people to think that dropping the preposition isn't as good English as having it in the expression.
However, it is wise to use discretion in leaving out the preposition. If omitting the preposition is liable to cause confusion or misunderstanding, don't drop it.
CB
Comments  
No! And if you were to drop it "Wednesday" would become part of the subject, i.e. "Nelson Mandela Wednesday", as if it were part of his name.
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I see, some parts of the extract and my post are not visible on my computer screen. I don't understand why. Do you see the whole post? I am posting the extract and my questions again.

By a Times Staff Writer
June 26, 2008

HARARE, ZIMBABWE -- Former South African leader Nelson Mandela on Wednesday joined a growing chorus of African officials criticizing Zimbabwe's leadership, further shaking longtime President Robert Mugabe's grip on power.


This is from Los Angeles Times. My question is can "on" before Wednesday be dropped? I put this qestion because I often come across dates and days without "on" before them, especially in news articles. When should I use "on" before a date or a day and when I should not? I am really confused.
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Thanks Mr. Huevos. Will others be kind enough to give their comments?

Mr. Huevos, can I say "Nelson Mandela joined a growing chorus of African officials Wednesday ..."?
 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks Mr. CB
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