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In my book:

I've even inherited his family's 'eyebrow' trait. The one thing that is different though are our eyes. My dad and his side of the family all have really dark brown eyes. (The speaker is blue-eyed.)

I've learned that 'A and B are a/an C' is possible.
Is "A/an A are B" like 'The different thing are our eyes' correct? I know the verb 'are' doesn't agree with the singular subject but it does make sense in the context.

Thanks
LiJ
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Hi,

Just an opinion: in matters of agreement, if you're writing or speaking informally, the "authorities" allow you to use the better sounding choice; but formal English requires the noun and verb to agree in number. There are boards of experts who vote on these controversial issues and the results are seldom unanimous.

In your second example, "THING ARE" sounds bad because of the proximity.

Regards, A.
Comments  
Avangi
Hi,

Just an opinion: in matters of agreement, if you're writing or speaking informally, the "authorities" allow you to use the better sounding choice; but formal English requires the noun and verb to agree in number. There are boards of experts who vote on these controversial issues and the results are seldom unanimous.

In your second example, "THING ARE" sounds bad because of the proximity.

Regards, A.

Thank you, Avangi. Emotion: smile I understand.

LiJ