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1. In my family, my sister is the only person who loves chocolate.

2. In my family, my sister is the only person that loves chocolate.

Which of the above sentences is more natural?
Comments  
I find both of them natural, but I'd say the first is better.

CJ
I agree with CJ on this. See the hits at the New York Times:

113 from nytimes.com for "the only person that"
3,340 from nytimes.com for "the only person who".
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I also feel that the only person who seems more common than the only person that; however, can anyone tell me why the following quotations are just the opposite?

The following is quoted from A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, page 1251.

When the antecedent is modified by a superlative or by one of the post-determiners first, last, next, only, the relative pronoun as subject is usually that, and as object, that or zero rather than which or who(m).

The following is quoted from Practical English Usage, Second Edition, page 490.

That is especially common after quantifiers like all, every(thing), some(thing), any(thing), no(thing), none, little, few, much, only, and after superlatives.
Aren't they synonyms? =)
Many people (including me) prefer to use "who" instead of "that" for people whenever possible.
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TeoThe following is quoted from A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, page 1251.

When the antecedent is modified by a superlative or by one of the post-determiners first, last, next, only, the relative pronoun as subject is usually that, and as object, that or zero rather than which or who(m).

The following is quoted from Practical English Usage, Second Edition, page 490.

That is especially common after quantifiers like all, every(thing), some(thing), any(thing), no(thing), none, little, few, much, only, and after superlatives.
Hi Teo

I am familiar with what you quote. There are lots of other grammar books that agree with Practical English Usage. However, speakers of English have their own way about this. Emotion: smile Perhaps we can consider the advice given in these grammar books a little dated.

Cheers
CB

#2 sounds more natural to me