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Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" ... province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

Look at the other examples. Is it possible the other sources are using the phrase as a title (part of ... to Turkey, Ross Wilson, stated on Monday. . . US Ambassador to Turkey Ross Wilson stated on Monday. . .

Sorry? Your last example cites someone who is the ambassador to some place called Turkey Ross Wilson! The comma may not be required by 'the
rules' but simple common sense says include it if there is the slightest possible chance of confusion.
Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" in the following text is needed. However, checking similar expressions ... airspace violation last week by US jets in Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

'The' is completely optional and a matter of taste in this example as far as I'm concerned. It's presence adds nothing and its absence takes
nothing away, although personally I feel its inclusion is slightly tautologous. There is only one US Ambassador to Turkey so the definite
article is already implied. Would it seem so important if the word order were changed slightly ..
Ross Wilson, US Ambassador to Turkey, stated .. ?
Would you insist on saying ..
The Roman Emperor Julius Caesar .. ?
The actress Kirsten Dunst .. ?
(In the latter, and arguably the former, of course, 'the' implies a status that is not necessarily fitting!)
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?The? US Ambassador to Turkey Ross Wilson stated on Monday ... province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

'The' is completely optional and a matter of taste in this example as far as I'm concerned. It's presence adds nothing and its absence takes nothing away,

Not at all. The version with "the" would be spoken with different intonation. If you wish your readers to read your words as if they were hearing your voice, you have to use the wording that gives the intonation.

And that is without mentioning that the version with "the" has "The US Ambassador to Turkey" as the subject of the verb, with the guy's name parenthesised (i.e. not connected to the verb), so the two versions are completely different syntactically.
It is different syntactically; it is different semantically; and it is different in its intonation so, most ways that grammar measures, the inclusion of "the" makes a big difference to the sentence.

Commenting "It's presence adds nothing and its absence takes nothing away" shows that you know absolutely nothing about writing in the English language or English grammar.
Library. Go.
Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" ... province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

It's a convention of journalistic writing to use a job title or occupation as though it were an honorific title (Mr. or Ms, etc.): US Ambassador to Wherever John Smith did such and such. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma played... TV game show host Alex Trebeck appeared...

It's a convention that can be taken to extremes. My personal favourite was something like:
"Top ten City property law firm Grab & Co managing partner Joe Bloggs said...".
Regards
Jonathan
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"Flying Tortoise" wrote in message Not at all. The version with "the" would be spoken with different intonation. If you wish your readers to read your words as if they were hearing your voice, you have to use the wording that gives the intonation.

I want my readers to understand what I'm saying not to 'hear my voice'. Your fondness for hearing your own is of course legendary and the reason you care so little for the actual content of what you write!
And that is without mentioning that the version with "the" has "The US Ambassador to Turkey" as the subject of the verb, with the guy's name parenthesised (i.e. not connected to the verb), so the two versions are completely different syntactically.

Bollocks! If the name is not connected to the verb what is it connected to, satellite TV? What's the answer to the question "Who stated that an airspace violation took place?". Not "Ross Noble", not "Ross Noble, US Ambassador", not "US Ambassador Ross Noble", only "The US Ambassador to Turkey"? Whatever way you order it, whether you include 'the' or not, the subject is the complete noun clause which indicates both "That Ross Noble who happens to be the US Ambassador" and "That US Ambassador who happens to be Ross Noble".
It is different syntactically; it is different semantically; and it is different in its intonation so, most ways that ... makes a big difference to the sentence. Commenting "It's presence adds nothing and its absence takes nothing away" shows that

... I am concerned to convey sense and meaning not waste energy on some abstract concept of 'correct' English? You can form this sentence any way you wish as long as it conveys the information that there is a US Ambassador to Turkey whose name is Ross Noble who made a statement on Monday concerning an airspace violation. What additional information is added by the inclusion of 'the' in this sentence? None! What information is excluded by the removal of 'the'. None!

As you are so utterly predictable, I will anticipate your next whine by emphasising that this is not to say that the inclusion of 'the' never changes the meaning or intention of a sentence or adds additional information. But I already made that clear when I specifically stated that my opinion was only good for this particular example. And please don't waste my time with a whine about not being interested in individual examples only the sanctity of English as a whole. Heard it all before.
you know absolutely nothing about writing in the English language
or English grammar.

When are you going to learn that repeating this pathetic mantra over and over again does not make it the slightest bit truer or more rational? Oh right, never, because you have nothing to learn from us academic, intellectual types who use long words with such pomposity. Oh well, at least ask yourself whether if someone does not understand the 'infield fly' rule (which, incidentally, I do, probably better than most spectators and many players) that would mean that that someone knows nothing about the regulation and playing of baseball. Rationality is not your strong suit I realise, but do try.
Library. Go.

I won't embarrass you by providing links to the many threads in which you disparage book learning because that would make it look like you'll say any old thing to portray yourself as the great guru and saviour of English. And we all know what happens to people who build their houses on shifting sands, don't we? Matt. 8:27
Regardless of your low opinion of MW and me, you must have some doubts about your answer to the OP's question. Both MW and I have explained to you how and why we answered the question as we did. You have nothing but insults to show your refusal to accept ideas that are contrary to yours. Do you really think you are helping the OP?
"Flying Tortoise" wrote in message Not at all. The ... you have to use the wording that gives the intonation.

I want my readers to understand what I'm saying not to 'hear my voice'. Your fondness for hearing your own is of course legendary and the reason you care so little for the actual content of what you write!

Kiddo, someone like you should be very wary of telling someone like me how to write.
And that is without mentioning that the version with "the" ... the verb), so the two versions are completely different syntactically.

Bollocks! If the name is not connected to the verb what is it connected to, satellite TV? What's the answer ... "That Ross Noble who happens to be the US Ambassador" and "That US Ambassador who happens to be Ross Noble".

Hmm. I'd like to introduce you to a word: "adjective". Now, toddle off to the library, to see what it means, and how to use it.
It is different syntactically; it is different semantically; and it ... adds nothing and its absence takes nothing away" shows that

... I am concerned to convey sense and meaning not waste energy on some abstract concept of 'correct' English? You ... added by the inclusion of 'the' in this sentence? None! What information is excluded by the removal of 'the'. None!

Certainly you may think that way so long as you do not try to imply that thinking that way has anything whatsoever to do with English grammar, which it does not.\
There is a world of difference between an adjective and a noun that acts as the subject of a verb.
That you cannot see the difference in grammar says quite a lot, methinks.

Library, Sonny. Study hard.
Bored with this, now. I told you before: Short answers, and no multiple answers. Unlike you, I have neither the time nor the inclination to spend all my time on Usenet.
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I want my readers to understand what I'm saying not ... so little for the actual content of what you write!

Kiddo, someone like you should be very wary of telling someone like me how to write.

Wouldn't dream of it! Would be nice if you learnt to read though. This describes how you *do* write!
Bollocks! If the name is not connected to the verb ... and "That US Ambassador who happens to be Ross Noble".

Hmm. I'd like to introduce you to a word: "adjective". Now, toddle off to the library, to see what it means, and how to use it.

I will willingly give my house and all its contents to any AEU reader who can identify an adjective or adjectival clause in the phrase "The US Ambassador to Turkey, Ross Noble".
... I am concerned to convey sense and meaning not ... What information is excluded by the removal of 'the'. None!

Certainly you may think that way so long as you do not try to imply that thinking that way ... There is a world of difference between an adjective and a noun that acts as the subject of a verb.

An adjective that acts as the subject? You've really lost it this time.
That you cannot see the difference in grammar says quite a lot, methinks.

I'm not drunk?
Library, Sonny. Study hard. Bored with this, now. I told you before: Short answers, and no multiple answers. Unlike you, I have neither the time nor the inclination to spend all my time on Usenet.

And yet ..
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