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Kiddo, someone like you should be very wary of telling someone like me how to write.

Wouldn't dream of it! Would be nice if you learnt to read though. This describes how you *do* write!

What does? I see nothing in your words that has anything to do with English grammar nor, for that matter, that gives instruction on how to use a pen.
Hmm. I'd like to introduce you to a word: "adjective". ... to see what it means, and how to use it.

I will willingly give my house and all its contents to any AEU reader who can identify an adjective or adjectival clause in the phrase "The US Ambassador to Turkey, Ross Noble".

Straw man.
The adjectival phrase is in "US Ambassador to Turkey(,) Ross Noble".

God, but I wish I were as clever and well educated as you are.
Certainly you may think that way so long as ... a noun that acts as the subject of a verb.

An adjective that acts as the subject? You've really lost it this time.

Hmm. It is becoming obvious that you really (as in */REALLY/*) don't know what you're talking about.
Get thee to a library.

And yet this was a better effort, on your part.
You still wrote nothing useful, but you wrote it more concisely.
rary, to see what it means, and how to use it.
I will willingly give my house and all its contents ... in the phrase "The US Ambassador to Turkey, Ross Noble".

Straw man. The adjectival phrase is in "US Ambassador to Turkey(,) Ross Noble".

Yeah. Kinda hoping for someone who doesn't have to cover his very vulnerable backside to give me an answer. Thanks for playing though.
God, but I wish I were as clever and well educated as you are.

Believe me. You don't! Just think of the lost impunity and the inability to delude yourself.
An adjective that acts as the subject? You've really lost it this time.

Hmm. It is becoming obvious that you really (as in */REALLY/*) don't know what you're talking about.

The only thing that's obvious is that I don't know what you're talking about. The worrying thing is that I'm far from sure that you do either.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
It's a convention of journalistic writing to use a job title or occupation as though it were an honorific title (Mr. or Ms, etc.):... TV game show host Alex Trebeck appeared...

Trebek.

Mark Brader "Poor spelling does not prove poor knowledge, Toronto but is fatal to the argument by intimidation." (Email Removed) Gene Ward Smith
It's a convention of journalistic writing to use a job title or occupation as though it were an honorific title (Mr. or Ms, etc.): US Ambassador to Wherever John Smith did such and such.

There's one more point to be made here: this locution gets ugly when the title is complicated or needs subsidiary information ("to Turkey") to provide specificity. Journalistic style may allow "US Ambassador to Turkey Ross Wilson", but good journalistic style would find another way to say it.

Mark Brader "It's simply a matter of style, and while there Toronto are many wrong styles, there really isn't any (Email Removed) one right style." Ray Butterworth
?The? US Ambassador to Turkey Ross Wilson stated on Monday ... province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

If the "the" is there, then "US Ambassador to Turkey" is a descriptor. Ideadlly, there should also be a comma following "Turkey" in this case.

If the "the" is there, "US Ambassador to Turkey" is the subject of the sentence, and his name is in apposition to the subject. Being in apposition, it needs commas both before it (and therefore after "Turkey") and after it: "The US Ambassador to Turkey, Ross Wilson, stated ..."
If it's not, "US Ambassador to Turkey" is his title, like "President" or "Prime Minister". There is no comma separating a title from the name.

One for two.

Bob Lieblich
Posting from AEU, lest those AUE pukes think I'm back
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" in the ... province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

"US Ambassador to Turkey" is his title. Compare it ot the following sentences (note hoe the word "president"is capitalized or not): a) "US President George W. Bush stated.." (title) b) "The US president, George W. Bush, stated.." (job desctiption)

Notice also that when "the" is added to the initial noun phrase, the name "George W. Bush" changes its grammatical relation to that noun phrase: it becomes an appositive and, therefore, a parenthetical expression that can be omitted without afftecting the grammar of the sentence. Without the "the", however, the initial noun phrase (a title) needs the president's name to be complete, so deleting "George W. Bush" would make the sentence ungrammatical, except in a headline:

"US President stated objection to troop-withdrawal timetable".

OTOH, "The US president stated his objection to a troop-withdrawal timetable" is a grammatically correct sentence.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
Native speaker of American English; posting from Taiwan. "Ignorant people think it's the noise which fighting cats make that is so aggravating, but it ain't so; it's the sickening grammar they use." Mark Twain.
Without the "the", however, the initial noun phrase (a title) needs the president's name to be complete, so deleting "George W. Bush" would make the sentence ungrammatical, except in a headline: "US President stated objection to troop-withdrawal timetable".

And furthermore, the convention in headlines is usually (almost always, I'd say) to use the present tense for recent events, so it would likely be: "US President states objection...".
OTOH, "The US president stated his objection to a troop-withdrawal timetable" is a grammatically correct sentence.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Without the "the", however, the initial noun phrase (a title) ... in a headline: "US President stated objection to troop-withdrawal timetable".

And furthermore, the convention in headlines is usually (almost always, I'd say) to use the present tense for recent events, so it would likely be: "US President states objection...".

It depends on what the headline is reporting, I'd say. If the president had previously denied stating any objection, then a new revelation that he had in fact stated an objection would be in the past tense , even in a headline. OTOH, your generalization about most headlines being in the present tense is generally true. The "news" is generally reported in the present tense in headlines.
OTOH, "The US president stated his objection to a troop-withdrawal timetable" is a grammatically correct sentence.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
Native speaker of American English; posting from Taiwan. "People love a man who can fight and don't take ***." George "Iceman" Chambers (played by Ving Rhames) in the 2002 movie Undisputed
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
And furthermore, the convention in headlines is usually (almost always, ... events, so it would likely be: "US President states objection...".

It depends on what the headline is reporting, I'd say. If the president had previously denied stating any objection, then a new revelation that he had in fact stated an objection would be in the past tense , even in a headline.

Yes, indeed. Very good observation. (You've obviously explained this sort of thing to people before!).
A longer headline could have both present and past: "US President stated objection to troop-withdrawal timetable, State Department sources say."
OTOH, your generalization about most headlines being in the present tense is generally true. The "news" is generally reported in the present tense in headlines.

Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap (at) verizon.net is heavily filtered to remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
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