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It's a convention of journalistic writing to use a job ... US Ambassador to Wherever John Smith did such and such.

There's one more point to be made here: this locution gets ugly when the title is complicated or needs subsidiary ... style may allow "US Ambassador to Turkey Ross Wilson", but good journalistic style would find another way to say it.

Such as?
rary, to see what it means, and how to use it.

I have explained this to you in great detail. Several other people have told you exactly the same thing as I have told you. You still do not understand.
Not my problem.
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Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" ... province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

"US Ambassador to Turkey" is his title. Compare it ot the following sentences (note hoe the word "president"is capitalized or not): a) "US President George W. Bush stated.." (title) b) "The US president, George W. Bush, stated.." (job desctiption)

Can we stop this "title"/"job description" thing, please? We're talking about grammar. Grammar doesn't care about such things.

Look at the different possibilities, and discern:
a: what the subject of the verb is,
b: if parenthesis is being used, and
c: if there is an adjectival phrase/clause in the sentence.

If you properly parse the different permutations, it's very, very obvious what the differences are.
"US Ambassador to Turkey" is his title. Compare it ot ... b) "The US president, George W. Bush, stated.." (job desctiption)

Can we stop this "title"/"job description" thing, please? We're talking about grammar. Grammar doesn't care about such things. Look at ... adjectival phrase/clause in the sentence. If you properly parse the different permutations, it's very, very obvious what the differences are.

I think there is a "title/job description" thing, and I think we did this a few months ago about Australian mayors.
It's my belief that AmE is much more comfortable with using someone's job description as a title.
So while we are all comfortable with "Dr George Brown said" and "The Doctor, George Brown, said", we non-AmE speakers get troubled by "Third Assistant to the Deputy Adjutant Bottle Washer Irving said", which appears to be standard AmE.

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Nick Atty (Email Removed) wrote
I think there is a "title/job description" thing,

I think so, too.
and I think we did this a few months ago about Australian mayors. It's my belief that AmE is much more comfortable with using someone's job description as a title.

Sometimes a title is merely the job description capitalized in GovSpeak. That's the way bureaucrats like things. They're no different from anyone else when they insist on doing things in their bailiwick their way.
So while we are all comfortable with "Dr George Brown said" and "The Doctor, George Brown, said", we non-AmE speakers get troubled by "Third Assistant to the Deputy Adjutant Bottle Washer Irving said", which appears to be standard AmE.

It is not Standard AmE, merely standard American journalese. When we Americans write formal English, we don't write newspaper articles. The bureaucrats, of course, will use their revolting GovSpeak in formal documents for their bosses, but that isn't standard AmE either.
You non-AmE speakers are just too thin-skinned and are far too prone to believing that your own brand of English is superior. Let's just say that your beliefs hold as much urine as all the religious bladders that claim to know and own the only Truth about the One True God. You're all pissing in the wind.
AmE has its problems, Ford knows. The more you complain about the, the more they will bother you. Why not complain about the problems your own brand has? You know a great deal more about them, I'm sure, than you seem to know about AmE's problems.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
Native speaker of American English; posting from Taiwan. "People love a man who can fight and don't take ***." George "Iceman" Chambers (played by Ving Rhames) in the 2002 movie Undisputed
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Hey, hey. hey.
I never expressed any sense of superiority. What I felt here was some confusion because what was natural to some people was not to others. That was all.
Careful readers will note that I haven't denied that it is superior, of course.

On-line canal route planner: http://www.canalplan.org.uk

(Waterways World site of the month, April 2001)
My Reply-To address *is* valid, though likely to die soon
Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" in the following text is needed. However, checking similar expressions ... airspace violation last week by US jets in Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

Do you think you do need a "the" here in front of "US jets" in order to specify these are the US jets in Turkey's province rather than anywhere?
AmE has its problems, Ford knows. The more you complain about the,

"them", of course.
the more they will bother you. Why not complain about ... I'm sure, than you seem to know about AmE's problems.

Hey, hey. hey. I never expressed any sense of superiority.

It's a matter of tone. The way you said what you said expressed your sense of superiority. One doesn't have to be as blatant as the new Longeines Watch commercial and come right out with it: "Elegance is an attitude". Anyone who needs to be told wouldn't understand without the words.
What I felt here was some confusion because what was natural to some people was not to others. That was all.

It's natural only for readers of American newspapers and stories written by employees of UPI, AP, Reuters, Agence France-Presse (AFP), and other sources of international news.
Careful readers will note that I haven't denied that it is superior, of course.

One need not be a careful reader to see that, of course. Sometimes that's a sign of clear writing.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
Native speaker of American English; posting from Taiwan. "Oh, come, all ye faithful. Don't leave church without singing!" Old Dutch ejaculation.
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Can we stop this "title"/"job description" thing, please? We're talking ... different permutations, it's very, very obvious what the differences are.

I think there is a "title/job description" thing, and I think we did this a few months ago about Australian ... said", which appears to be standard AmE. By 'we' you mean you, of course? I have no difficulty with it.

I note that that august organ which is The Times opts out of this controversy by always giving the name first and then the title;

"James Freemantle, industry affairs adviser at the ATUC, said:"

And that would be my natural style also. But the Telegraph, normally considered the more conservative of the papers, has no problems with ...
"US President George W. Bush is holding talks with Pope Benedict XVI, his first audience with the pontiff."
and
"Earlier today, Mr Bush paid a visit to Italian President Giorgio Napolitano and is scheduled to hold talks with Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi this afternoon."
... so why should I?
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