Hello All:
To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" in the following text is needed. However, checking similar expressions from various sources show no "the"s.
How so?
Thanks,
Ahmet Toprak
?The? US Ambassador to Turkey Ross Wilson stated on Monday that an airspace violation last week by US jets in Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.
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Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" in the following text is needed. However, checking similar expressions ... airspace violation last week by US jets in Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

It's a convention of journalistic writing to use a job title or occupation as though it were an honorific title (Mr. or Ms, etc.):

US Ambassador to Wherever John Smith did such and such.

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TV game show host Alex Trebeck appeared...
Outside of a newspaper or news magazine or news broadcast (e.g. in a book written sometime after the event) I'd expect both the article "the" and a couple of commas, and appropriate changes in the verb tenses something like:
"The US Ambassador to Turkey, Ross Wilson, stated on June 4, 2007 that an airspace violation the previous week by US jets in Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari bordering Iraq had been due to pilot error."

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Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" in the following text is needed. However, checking similar expressions ... airspace violation last week by US jets in Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

If the "the" is there, then "US Ambassador to Turkey" is a descriptor. Ideadlly, there should also be a comma following "Turkey" in this case.
If it's not, "US Ambassador to Turkey" is his title, like "President" or "Prime Minister". There is no comma separating a title from the name.

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Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" in the following text is needed. However, checking similar expressions ... airspace violation last week by US jets in Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

Look at the other examples. Is it possible the other sources are using the phrase as a title (part of his name)? If so, then no article "The" is required.
If the phrase is used appositively, then "The" is required. However, in the latter case, commas to set off the man's name are desirable, since the name is a more detailed identification of "The US Ambassador to Turkey, Ross Wilson, stated on Monday etc." The commas indicating more detail also indicate that the name is not required as part of the subject of the sentence.
The US Ambassador to Turkey stated on Monday. . .
The US Ambassador to Turkey, Ross Wilson, stated on Monday. . . US Ambassador to Turkey Ross Wilson stated on Monday. . .
Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" ... province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

Look at the other examples. Is it possible the other sources are using the phrase as a title (part of ... to Turkey, Ross Wilson, stated on Monday. . . US Ambassador to Turkey Ross Wilson stated on Monday. . .

Sorry? Your last example cites someone who is the ambassador to some place called Turkey Ross Wilson! The comma may not be required by 'the rules' but simple common sense says include it if there is the slightest possible chance of confusion.
'The' is completely optional and a matter of taste in this example as far as I'm concerned. It's presence adds nothing and its absence takes nothing away, although personally I feel its inclusion is slightly tautologous. There is only one US Ambassador to Turkey so the definite article is already implied. Would it seem so important if the word order were changed slightly ..
Ross Wilson, US Ambassador to Turkey, stated .. ?

Would you insist on saying ..
The Roman Emperor Julius Caesar .. ?
The actress Kirsten Dunst .. ?
(In the latter, and arguably the former, of course, 'the' implies a status that is not necessarily fitting!)
Look at the other examples. Is it possible the other ... Ambassador to Turkey Ross Wilson stated on Monday. . .

Sorry? Your last example cites someone who is the ambassador to some place called Turkey Ross Wilson! The comma may ... seem so important if the word order were changed slightly .. Ross Wilson, US Ambassador to Turkey, stated .. ?

The OP gave a word order and asked about the use of "The". Your suggested change in word order, while not incorrect, is beside the point.
Would you insist on saying .. The Roman Emperor Julius Caesar .. ?

No, not at all.
I said that "the" is used when only the title is needed, and the name is mere detail, as indicated by appositional commas.
The actress Kirsten Dunst .. ?

Ditto.
(In the latter, and arguably the former, of course, 'the' implies a status that is not necessarily fitting!)

You really want an argument, don't you?
Why did you not post your suggestion directly after the OP?
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Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" in the following text is needed. However, checking similar expressions ... airspace violation last week by US jets in Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

There is only one US Ambassador to Turkey, so "the" is appropriate if it is being used as the subject of the verb (with the person's name added parenthetically); but it can be omitted, if it is being used as a title (like Mr, Sir, or Lord).
Take out the name, and see how it feels:
"The US Ambassador to Turkey stated on Monday ~~" or:
"US Ambassador to Turkey stated on Monday ~~"
Hello All: To me, a "the" before the "US ambassador" in the following text is needed. However, checking similar expressions ... airspace violation last week by US jets in Turkey's southeastern province of Hakkari bordering Iraq was due to pilot error.

"US Ambassador to Turkey" is his title.
Compare it ot the following sentences (note hoe the word "president"is capitalized or not):
a) "US President George W. Bush stated.." (title) b) "The US president, George W. Bush, stated.." (job desctiption)

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Me? I don't think so. Sure you're not confusing me with someone else? Yourself perhaps?
Why did you not post your suggestion directly after the OP?

Why? Is that a rule or something? Hang on then ..
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