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Hello everyone, actually my question is very easy today but I just wondering whether my idea is right or not.

I have lived in Paris with my family for a long time and I think Paris is a very nice city.

So, I want to include all those informations in one sentence.

Is it correct that "I have lived in Paris, which is a very nice city, with my family for a long time." ? Thank you in advance.

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Comments  
JawelIs it correct that "I have lived in Paris, which is a very nice city, with my family for a long time."

The word order is very awkward. Learners often try to include too much information in a single sentence. Perhaps it reflects the way their own language works.

Yes actually we can include lots of informations in a sentence on our own language. In spite of lots of information,

What is the best order to say it?

I have lived in Paris with my family, which is a nice city, for a long time

or

I have lived in Paris with my family for a long time, which is a nice city.

or

I have lived in Paris, which is a nice city, with my family for a long time.

Which one would you choose?

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

You need something more like these:

I have lived in the beautiful city of Paris with my family for a long time.
I have lived for a long time with my family in the beautiful city of Paris.

Or, if you insist on a relative clause with the word 'nice':

I have lived for a long time with my family in Paris, which is a nice city.

CJ

But, your last sentence is coming with more than one meaning.

First of all, it is a reverse sentence and then "with my family in Paris" can mean "my family were in Paris."

JawelFirst of all, it is a reverse sentence

There is no such thing as a reverse sentence. You can move phrases around in a sentence. There's no rule against it.

Jawel"with my family in Paris" can mean "my family were in Paris."

Your family were in Paris no matter which phrase order you use. If you were living in Paris and you were living with your family, then your family were certainly not in Tokyo or Santiago. Where else could they be but in Paris?

CJ

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Okay I understood you but why did you accept "I have lived in Paris, which is a nice country, with my family for a long time" as a correct sentence?

Additionally, Are "with my family" and "Paris" noun phrases together?

Jawelwhy did you accept "I have lived in Paris, which is a nice country, with my family for a long time" as a correct sentence?

I didn't say anything about that sentence. I just gave you some better ones.

As it happens, your sentence is grammatically correct but it is awkward, as has already been mentioned by another contributor.

JawelAre "with my family" and "Paris" noun phrases together?

I don't know what you mean by "together".

"my family" is a noun phrase [NP].
"with my family" is a preposition phrase [PP].
"Paris" is an NP.
"in Paris" is a PP.

CJ

What if I put "which" just after "with my family" ? What would happen? and "with my family" and "paris" together means : "We can not use them from each other, because they are completing each other. "with my family" is defining to "paris". Right?

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