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“Father, Father !” The people of Tonj, South Sudan, were all crying.

Some children were walking with pictures of a man.

They had lost a very special person.

The man in the picture was Father Lee Taeseok, a Korean priest and doctor.

In 2001, Father Lee Taeseok visited Tonj to help the sick and poor people there.

Life in Tonj was very difficult, so he soon returned to Korea.

However, he could not forget the people there.

So he flew to Tonj again later that year.

From then on, Father John Lee, as the villagers called him, worked tirelessly as a doctor, teacher, and musician.

Q. what is the part of speech of 'as' ? Is it a conjunction?

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HoonyQ. what is the part of speech of 'as' ?
What part of speech is 'as'? Is it a conjunction?

Yes, according to the Oxford Dictionary.

https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/as

as: Used to indicate by comparison the way that something happens or is done. (They can do as they wish.)

CJ

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HoonyFrom then on, Father John Lee, as the villagers called him, worked tirelessly as a doctor, teacher, and musician.
Q. what is the part of speech of 'as' ? Is it a conjunction?

I do not feel 100% convinced that it is a conjunction in this sentence. I think a case could be made that it is a relative adverb ... but I wouldn't stake my house on it!

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From then on, Father John Lee, [as the villagers called him], worked tirelessly as a doctor, teacher, and musician.

No, it's not a conjunction. Modern grammar takes this "as" to be a preposition with the underlined clause as its complement. The bracketed preposition phrase then functions as an adjunct of comparison.

The comparison here is one of equality between the two variables: "x (Father John Lee)"; "the villagers called him "y"; x=y

The comparative bears a strong resemblance to a supplementary relative construction (cf. which the villagers called him), but there are syntactic differences.

Semantically, there's no real difference between the two constructions.

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GPY... a case could be made that ...

Yes. That too. Some kind of relative word. Why not?

But "adverb"? "as" can be paraphrased as "which" there, so I don't follow how "adverb" gets in there.

CJ

CalifJimBut "adverb"? "as" can be paraphrased as "which" there, so I don't follow how "adverb" gets in there.

I would say that "which" would refer directly to "Father John Lee", whereas "as" is slightly more indirect in its reference, having more of a flavour of "by which (name)", hence the adverbial nuance. However, this is quite a hair-splitting distinction that I do not feel totally confident about.

GPYmore of a flavour of "by which (name)"

Ah. OK. I think I can see it that way too.

CJ

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 BillJ's reply was promoted to an answer.
HoonyFrom then on, Father John Lee, as the villagers called him, worked tirelessly as a doctor, teacher, and musician.

I see "as the villagers called him" as a supplement in the sentence above. Am I correct?

tkacka15I see "as the villagers called him" as a supplement in the sentence above. Am I correct?

Yes, as I said in my answer, it's an adjunct of comparison.

The commas mark it more specifically as a supplement with the NP "Father John Lee" as semantic anchor.

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