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Deploying tens of thousands of troops, U.S. security commander said their goal is to secure the capital city and put an end to the ever increasing violence.

U.S. security commander, deploying tens of thousands of troops, said their goal is to secure the capital city and put an end to the ever increasing violence.

U.S. security commander deploying tens of thousands of troops, said their goal is to secure the capital city and put an end to the ever increasing violence.

Hello,

Do 1. and 2. have the same meaning and does the 'Deploying tens of thousands of troops' part function as an adverb in both of sentences?

Doesn't, in the third sentence, the same phrase function as an adj. as in the sentence 'U.S. security commander, who deploys tens of thousands of troops, said their goal is to secure the capital city and put an end to the ever increasing violence. ?

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1 and 2 mean the same; the nonfinite clause is a sentence adverbial in both. The 3rd is simply improperly punctuated: it needs a comma after commander, as in #2. There is only one commander, so the nonfinite clause will be nonrestrictive in any case-- and remain adverbial in function.

Present participial clauses will more often appear as sentence adverbials because they relate to the present moment of the sentence; past participial clauses are likely to be adjectival: The commander, exhausted by the deployment, sat down and smoked a cigar.

The definite article is needed before US in all three sentences.
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I was going to say the same thing.

Or maybe it was supposed to be commanders, since it says their?

CJ
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Should there not be 'the' in front of 'US security commander' or have the commander's name after 'US security commander'?
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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CalifJimI was going to say the same thing.

Or maybe it was supposed to be commanders, since it says their?

CJ

Hi, CJ, It's only one commander that speaks on behalf of the troops under him.
In that case the preceding comment applies in full force. You need either to follow commander by the name of the commander or use the.

CJ