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Hi there! Emotion: smile

Help me, please. I have a sentence from a grammar test:

Bett had sprained her wrist and I had to write out her homework for her.

I thought that when we narrate an order of past events, we use the Past Simple for all the verbs.

Why is the Past Perfect used here before the Past Simple? Does it make the action in the Past Perfect more 'distant' in time?

I suggested that such a usage is wrong without an appropriate context (which might have been existed but not presented in the test).

Thanks for any answers!
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nkspbI thought that when we narrate an order of past events, we use the Past Simple for all the verbs.
Yes. That's possible here as well. (Note that I prefer 'so' for 'and'.)

Bett sprained her wrist, so I had to write out her homework for her.

However, the past perfect is OK too because the wrist-spraining happened before the writing, which happened in the past.

Bett had sprained her wrist, so I had to write out her homework for her.
OR
I had to write out Bett's homework for her because she had sprained her wrist.

CJ
Thanks. Emotion: smile
Interesting, why then do people use the Past Perfect in sentences like this, if the Past Simple works nice here.

Is there slight difference between the two sentences? Does the Past Perfect somehow emphasize the past action here?
CalifJimBett had sprained her wrist, so I had to write out her homework for her.
CalifJimBett sprained her wrist, so I had to write out her homework for her.
Could you clarify, please?
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nkspbIs there slight difference between the two sentences?
Very slight. If you use "Bett sprained" there is only one span of time, and the only relationship between the clauses is that of sequence. This happened. Then that happened. There is no overt statement of any other relationship. The two events are given equal importance. It's a very simple story.

If you use "Bett had sprained" there are two distinct points in time that are of interest to the speaker. More than just a sequence of events, there is the implication that one event (Bett had sprained her wrist) is secondary to the other, more important event (I wrote for her). The relationship is "because". It was because she had sprained her wrist that the action of the main clause was even necessary. So this version not only tells the story, but it puts more focus on the explanatory aspect of the story.

CJ
I got it, thanks!) As I see, I could also say an isolated sentence with a perfect continuous verb like this:

"I had been listening to music, so I did not here you came."

Is it correct to say this? Thanks.
nkspbI could also say an isolated sentence with a perfect continuous verb like this:"I had been listening to music, so I did not hear you come in."
Correct (as shown).

And also: I was listening to music, so I did not hear you come in.

CJ
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Thanks for the correction Emotion: smile

So, I guess, the Past Perfect can emphasize the action in a manner of the Present Perfect (having importance at some point in the past)?

Am I right?
That's right.

CJ
Cool, I haven't read about it anywhere, so needed some proof Emotion: thinking Thanks! Emotion: smile
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