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1. I went out after I had had my dinner.
2. She got married as soon as she had completed her studies.

I found the above two sentences on a web site which describes the past perfect tense in English.

I would agree with the second sentence of the above. It is a clear past perfect sentence.

She got married --> May be in the year 2002

She completed her studies --> May be in the year 2001

Today we are in the year 2005. The basic requirement is 'past in the past' to write past perfect tense.
Today or rather in the year 2005, we are talking about two events which took place in 2001 and 2002.

I am not comfortable with the first sentence. Is it a correct past perfect sentence?
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Comments  
I went out after I had had my dinner. = I went out after I had EATEN my dinner.

Now you can answer your question by yourself, I think?
Thanks Elmal

Now it is clear to me.
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I had brushed my teeth before having breakfast.

Is the above fine? I mean whether it is correct past perfect sentence.
Hello Andrei

1. I went out after I had eaten my dinner.
2. She got married as soon as she had completed her studies.

If I were asked if they are grammatically correct, I would answer YES. But I feel they are somehow wordy. I rather go with:
1. I went out after I ate/had my dinner.
2. She got married as soon as she completed her studies.

We don't have to differentiate tenses when using "after" and "as soon as". These conjunctions themselves make the time sequence of two events clear.

As for your second question, I'll say like:
"I brushed my teeth before breakfast".
I think our language tends to economize speech, whatever language it may be.

By the way I brush my teeth after breakfast rather than before breakfast.
This would be better in economizing the time to keep our teeth healthy.

paco
Paco
I know it is not necessary to use past perfect. You can just use the simple past. Therefore ' I brused my teeth before breakfast' is more than enough. I just gave an example to illustrate the past perfect.

So my question was whether the sentence was correct.
[ I had brushed my teeth before having breakfast.]

I hope you will find time to answer my question.
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I had brushed my teeth before having breakfast.

Is the above fine? I mean whether it is correct past perfect sentence.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Yes , it's fine, Andrei, in the right circumstances. The past perfect is used to add semantic significance. In a normal neutral situation, the simple past would be the usual choice.

Prosecutor: So, after breakfast, you brushed your teeth and then you left the house.

Witness: No no, I had brushed my teeth before having breakfast. I remember this because I woke up with a grungy taste in my mouth.
hi,
I went out after I had had my dinner.

if i were andry

i would say " i went out after i had dinner or i ate my dinner."

and first sentence is incorrect i think
Thanks everybody for the replies

Paco has written the following:

By the way I brush my teeth after breakfast rather than before breakfast.
This would be better in economizing the time to keep our teeth healthy.

In order to maintain healthy teeth, it would be better to brush after breakfast. I don't think you would find time to brush your teeth after breakfast. I just drive my car to work direct after breakfast. I brush my teeth before breakfast.

I believe some people or rather some cultures brushing teeth after breakfast exist.
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