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Hi, teachers. Please help me when you are free.

Is it possible to combine the perfect form with the subjunctive mood?

For example, Is it possible to turn "The train has already left." or "The train had already left When I reached the station." into the subjunctive mood with "if"?

If possible, I wish you would take the example sentences.
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You can use either one! It all depends on what time you are talking about - present or past:

The unreal conditional (often named 2nd Conditional or Conditional Type II) describes unreal or imaginary situations. The if-clause uses the past form, the main clause uses would+present tense. It is also used for expressing a wish in the present. For the verb "live" and the present form, we would more naturally use the verb "be"+ alive.
  • If my father were alive today, I would ask him for advice. (right now)
  • I wish my father were alive today. (right now) (Note: in colloquial English, the strict subjunctive form is declining, so you will often hear: "I wish my father was alive today."
  • If he were only alive today. How happy I would be.
The 3rd conditional (often named Conditional Type III) is used to express possibility of something having happened in the past, which did not actually happen. The if-clause uses the past perfect, and the main clause would+present perfect. It is also used for expressing a wish in the past.
  • If my father had lived longer, I would have asked him for advice. (past)
  • I wish my father had lived to see the birth of his grandson. (past)
Comments  
The past perfect is indistinguishable from the past subjunctive. Is that what you meant?

If the train had already left, we would have had to take a car.

This conditional structure is virtually the only use of the past subjunctive.
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The subjunctive associated with the present perfect is rare and is only noticeable in the third person singular: He / she / it have + Past Participle. It is often seen followed by a before clause.

It is important that the student have completed all the required forms before attending the help session.
We strongly recommend that the patient have visited the laboratory for blood work before discussing his case with the attending physician.
The committee refused to waive the requirement that the candidate have lived in an English-speaking country for at least two years.

CJ
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The past perfect subjunctive is used in a subordinate clause after a main clause expressing a wish, when the subordinate clause refers to a earlier time.

I wish I had been at the station before the train left. (I was not at the station.)
If only I had left the house earlier. Then I would have been on time.

Past perfect subjunctive is used in an if-clause for a situation that was not true in the past. "Would" is used as a modal in the main clause that expresses the consequence.

If the train had left on time, then we would not have been so late. (It did not leave on time, and we were late.)

If the train had already left when I reached the station, then I would not be on it now. (I was at the station before the train left, and so now I am on it.)
Thank you, both.

By the way, "I wish my father had lived to see me now!" is the conditional type3 ? I'm wondering if the conditional type2 "I wish my father lived to see me now!" is better, because that sentence contains "now". But from what I hear, "I wish my father had lived to see me now!" associates the subjunctive with the present perfect "My father has lived to see me now.", namely the conditional type2. Is it true? Which is right, the conditional type2 or 3?
 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
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It can be put in present perfect and past perfect using "if" like this:

  • If the train have already left, we shall/will take the next train. (formal present perfect subjunctive)

  • If the train had already left, we should/would take the next train. (formal past perfect subjunctive)
You can substitute the modal "should" between "train" and "have" to read like this:

  • If the train should have already left, we shall/will take the next train.

  • Should the train have already left, we shall/will take the next train.
If you conjugate "to have" in the present indicative as "the train has", this is considered an informal condition or it means something entirely different:

  • If the train has already left, we shall/will take the next train. (Informal present perfect subjunctive or formal present perfect indicative statement)
"If", in this situation, can also mean "since". Here, the speaker knows the train has left the station so he is stating a fact. Most times, though, in Modern spoken English, the speaker doesn't differentiate and this is probably an uncertain situation.

  • "Damn, the train has left the station already."

  • "Well, if/since the train has already left, we shall/will take the next train."
I meant this:

  • If the train had already left, we should/would have taken the next train.