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What does "suit yourself" mean? I foujn this nifty thread and got all confused: http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/31/messages/1140.html

I always thought it meant "you've got yourself to blame". If someone who went to bed @ 4a.m. complains "Damn I'm so tired", I reply "suit yourself, you stayed up all night". Is this wrong?

If it's wrong, then what's the correct phrase for "you've only got yourself to blame".?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
I think you people are right here:

"Serves you right!"

is probably what I had in mind.
thanks for all the replies, makes much more sense now Emotion: big smile
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The way you were using "suit yourself" you mean to say, "serves you right."
reffers to the decision you make. like: do whatever you think fits your needs/wills best.
I agree with you Saska, I´m american and suit yourself is make your own choice, make a choice that pleases you..
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I've often heard "suit you" used as Grammar Geek described, usually with something else tacked on--- "just fine" or "down to the ground." Must be an AE thing.

2 gossiping housewives:

I hear Cindy's going back to Texas to take care of her sick mother.
Oh? That ought to suit Bill just fine - now he can see his mistress every night instead of just on weekends.

2 college students:

What an awful schedule! You're in class till nine o'clock every night!
Oh, that suits me right down to the ground. I'm a night owl.

There's also the expression "suit [one's] book" ---- that one, I believe, is BE - don't hear it over here but I've read it. Not quite sure where that came from - bookkeeping for a business, maybe? That situation is desirable for you = the numbers in your account book will show a profit ?
"Suit youself" means "do whatever you like"

In that example you gave, sleeping late then complaining afterwards, the correct expression to use is: "You asked for it." e.g., You asked for it, I told you to sleep early.

You can use the expression: "suit yourself" in this way:

Friend A: I know I shouldn't go to the States, but I miss my friends there.

Friend B: Suit yourself. Whatever makes you happy.

Emotion: smile
It is actually "suits yourself", implying what you decide on is based on your needs and wants. And also a great statement to say that I would still do what you think that we should not do?

Eg:

Person 1: I am going to Transformers 2 movie. Do you want to come with me?

Person 2: No. I don't like to watch fighting robots

Person 1: Suits yourself!!
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hi,

Person 1: I am going to Transformers 2 movie. Do you want to come with me?

Person 2: No. I don't like to watch fighting robots

Person 1: Suits yourself!! No. The correct phrase here is 'Suit yourself'.

It means 'Do as you choose, do as you wish, do what suits you'.

Best wishes, Clive
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