Hi. Thank you for the comments.
The biggest question I had was:
The phrase "which xxx to (verb)" is singular orplural?

1. Which letter to send is a difficult problem.
2. Which conditions to apply is a difficult problem.
3. Which licensing conditions to apply needs to bedetermined.
4. Which licensing conditions to deliver to the userneeds to be determined. (I'm not sure about this one.)

The clause "which xxx to (verb)" is like a
shorthand for "The question of which ...".
Is this true?
Where this is true, the phrase is singular.

However,
Which condition is the problem?
Which conditions are the problem?
Which conditions for delivery are the problem?
I guess these can be distiguished from 3 and 4 above, because here "which" is used to make a question.

Could someone comment?
I'd esp. appreciate links to web pages that explain this, and reference to old Fowler (1944).
A newer edition of Fowler didn't have anything
relevant under the entry for "which".

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Hi. Thank you for the comments. The biggest question I had was:

Hard to tell, but..
1. Which letter to send is a difficult problem.

I think we want a gerund here..
1. Determining which letter to send is a difficult problem.

Gerunds seem to be always singular this far..
2. Which conditions to apply is a difficult problem.

Same here.
3. Which licensing conditions to apply needs to be determined.

3. We need to determine which licensing conditions to apply.
4. Which licensing conditions to deliver to the user needs to be determined. (I'm not sure about this one.)

Same here.
The clause "which xxx to (verb)" is like a shorthand for "The question of which ...". Is this true? Where this is true, the phrase is singular.

Guess you're right. But omitting it sounds, to me, like a shortening of "Whichever xxx we want to (verb), that xxx is..". Though rather unidiomatic.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Hi. Thank you for the comments. The biggest question I had was:

Hard to tell, but..
1. Which letter to send is a difficult problem.

I think we want a gerund here..
1. Determining which letter to send is a difficult problem.

Gerunds seem to be always singular this far..
2. Which conditions to apply is a difficult problem.

Same here.
3. Which licensing conditions to apply needs to be determined.

3. We need to determine which licensing conditions to apply.
4. Which licensing conditions to deliver to the user needs to be determined. (I'm not sure about this one.)

Same here.
The clause "which xxx to (verb)" is like a shorthand for "The question of which ...". Is this true? Where this is true, the phrase is singular.

Guess you're right. But omitting it sounds, to me, like a shortening of "Whichever xxx we want to (verb), that xxx is..". Though rather unidiomatic.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi. Thank you for the comments. The biggest question I had was:

Hard to tell, but..
1. Which letter to send is a difficult problem.

I think we want a gerund here..
1. Determining which letter to send is a difficult problem.

Gerunds seem to be always singular this far..
2. Which conditions to apply is a difficult problem.

Same here.
3. Which licensing conditions to apply needs to be determined.

3. We need to determine which licensing conditions to apply.
4. Which licensing conditions to deliver to the user needs to be determined. (I'm not sure about this one.)

Same here.
The clause "which xxx to (verb)" is like a shorthand for "The question of which ...". Is this true? Where this is true, the phrase is singular.

Guess you're right. But omitting it sounds, to me, like a shortening of "Whichever xxx we want to (verb), that xxx is..". Though rather unidiomatic.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Hi. Thank you for the comments. The biggest question I had was:

Hard to tell, but..
1. Which letter to send is a difficult problem.

I think we want a gerund here..
1. Determining which letter to send is a difficult problem.

Gerunds seem to be always singular this far..
2. Which conditions to apply is a difficult problem.

Same here.
3. Which licensing conditions to apply needs to be determined.

3. We need to determine which licensing conditions to apply.
4. Which licensing conditions to deliver to the user needs to be determined. (I'm not sure about this one.)

Same here.
The clause "which xxx to (verb)" is like a shorthand for "The question of which ...". Is this true? Where this is true, the phrase is singular.

Guess you're right. But omitting it sounds, to me, like a shortening of "Whichever xxx we want to (verb), that xxx is..". Though rather unidiomatic.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Hi. Thank you for the comments. The biggest question I had was:

Hard to tell, but..
1. Which letter to send is a difficult problem.

I think we want a gerund here..
1. Determining which letter to send is a difficult problem.

Gerunds seem to be always singular this far..
2. Which conditions to apply is a difficult problem.

Same here.
3. Which licensing conditions to apply needs to be determined.

3. We need to determine which licensing conditions to apply.
4. Which licensing conditions to deliver to the user needs to be determined. (I'm not sure about this one.)

Same here.
The clause "which xxx to (verb)" is like a shorthand for "The question of which ...". Is this true? Where this is true, the phrase is singular.

Guess you're right. But omitting it sounds, to me, like a shortening of "Whichever xxx we want to (verb), that xxx is..". Though rather unidiomatic.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi. Thank you for the comments. The biggest question I had was:

Hard to tell, but..
1. Which letter to send is a difficult problem.

I think we want a gerund here..
1. Determining which letter to send is a difficult problem.

Gerunds seem to be always singular this far..
2. Which conditions to apply is a difficult problem.

Same here.
3. Which licensing conditions to apply needs to be determined.

3. We need to determine which licensing conditions to apply.
4. Which licensing conditions to deliver to the user needs to be determined. (I'm not sure about this one.)

Same here.
The clause "which xxx to (verb)" is like a shorthand for "The question of which ...". Is this true? Where this is true, the phrase is singular.

Guess you're right. But omitting it sounds, to me, like a shortening of "Whichever xxx we want to (verb), that xxx is..". Though rather unidiomatic.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Hi. Thank you for the comments. The biggest question I had was:

Hard to tell, but..
1. Which letter to send is a difficult problem.

I think we want a gerund here..
1. Determining which letter to send is a difficult problem.

Gerunds seem to be always singular this far..
2. Which conditions to apply is a difficult problem.

Same here.
3. Which licensing conditions to apply needs to be determined.

3. We need to determine which licensing conditions to apply.
4. Which licensing conditions to deliver to the user needs to be determined. (I'm not sure about this one.)

Same here.
The clause "which xxx to (verb)" is like a shorthand for "The question of which ...". Is this true? Where this is true, the phrase is singular.

Guess you're right. But omitting it sounds, to me, like a shortening of "Whichever xxx we want to (verb), that xxx is..". Though rather unidiomatic.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Hi. Thank you for the comments. The biggest question I had was:

Hard to tell, but..
1. Which letter to send is a difficult problem.

I think we want a gerund here..
1. Determining which letter to send is a difficult problem.

Gerunds seem to be always singular this far..
2. Which conditions to apply is a difficult problem.

Same here.
3. Which licensing conditions to apply needs to be determined.

3. We need to determine which licensing conditions to apply.
4. Which licensing conditions to deliver to the user needs to be determined. (I'm not sure about this one.)

Same here.
The clause "which xxx to (verb)" is like a shorthand for "The question of which ...". Is this true? Where this is true, the phrase is singular.

Guess you're right. But omitting it sounds, to me, like a shortening of "Whichever xxx we want to (verb), that xxx is..". Though rather unidiomatic.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox, aside from its being the unfortunate victim of intensive mail-bombing at the moment. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
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