+0
Hi. Please help. Do you see the underlined part as referencing two different things, that is, the physical realm and emotional realm, or do you see as one realm with the terms "physical and emotional" as being some sort of modifier of the noun "realm"? (I think the question might not be clear, but please try to help me.)

It affects the physical and emotional realm.

Would it have any effect on your response if the word "both" were added?

It affects both the physical and emotional realm (realms?).

I am asking because I am sure we use the plural form of the noun "pages" in this example phrase and wonder why it could not be the plural form for the above (if it can't indeed be in the plural form).

example phrase:

Please look at the first and second pages of your book.
+0
It affects the physical and emotional realm.-- In spite of the syntax, common sense tells us that the writer speaks of 2 realms.

Would it have any effect on your response if the word "both" were added? It affects both the physical and emotional realms. -- Those clarifications are indeed what is called for.

Please look at the first and second pages of your book.-- Fine, too.
Comments  
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hi. Thank you. Would you say that both the phrases "the physical and emotional realm" and "the physical and emotional realms" can be used to denote two separate realms (and acceptable?)?

Also, would you say the following two are acceptable as to mean two executives? I think here the word "executive" means a group of executive members (if I am not wrong)?

He will act as a liason between the chapter and national executive/the chapter and national executives.

Thank you in advance for your help.
Would you say that both the phrases "the physical and emotional realm" and "the physical and emotional realms" can be used to denote two separate realms (and acceptable?)?-- I think that the singular is very poor style here. I won't say it's wrong, because it occurs too often.

Also, would you say the following two are acceptable as to mean two executives?

He will act as a liaison between the chapter and national executive/the chapter and national executives.

I think here the word "executive" means a group of executive members (if I am not wrong)?-- Aha! This is a good example of how the singular/plural can confuse. In the sentence, common sense tells us there are 2, chapter and national. If the singular 'executive' is used, it is a term for a group (so that there are 2 groups of executives). If the plural 'executives' is used, there are either 2 groups or 2 individuals. (Of course, the person to whom the sentence is addressed will know which is the case.) That's how I see it.