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Greetings,

I'm struggling with translating a sentence into English. The source language is Turkish and it is infamous for potentially endless clauses. One can literally build Turkish sentences indefinitely without breaking grammar rules (although the sentence would lose all coherence after a while). This sentence has a very long relative clause and I was wondering if I could place the verb of the sentence before this massive clause as below:


Any action can be defined as “teaching” that involves propagating and disseminating knowledge for the purpose of systematically enabling an understanding of the theoretical principles and/or practical applications of any discipline or profession, sharing experience and methodology related to any profession or area of expertise or providing instructions for the fulfillment of any task that requires proficiency and understanding in a discipline or profession.


Does "any action" have to be alone up there as the subject of the sentence or can I move the predicate of the sentence to the beginning as I've done here? I hear this usage in spoken English sometimes but I couldn't be sure if it could be used in written form as well. I really appreciate your help in clarifying this.


Also, I'm aware of a solution where changing "that" into "so long as it" does away with all the commotion but I really need to learn if long relative clauses can be pushed to the end of sentences when necessary (especially in situations like this)


Thank you.

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Galip DönmezDoes "any action" have to be alone up there as the subject of the sentence or can I move the predicate of the sentence to the beginning as I've done here? I hear this usage in spoken English sometimes but I couldn't be sure if it could be used in written form as well. I really appreciate your help in clarifying this.

Not only can you, you'd better. This is commonly done in English, and the other way would be abominable.

Galip DönmezAlso, I'm aware of a solution where changing "that" into "so long as it" does away with all the commotion but I really need to learn if long relative clauses can be pushed to the end of sentences when necessary (especially in situations like this)

You mean make the long clause parenthetical. For that, you need to enclose it in commas.

Any action, so long as it involves propagating and disseminating knowledge for the purpose of systematically enabling an understanding of the theoretical principles and/or practical applications of any discipline or profession, sharing experience and methodology related to any profession or area of expertise or providing instructions for the fulfillment of any task that requires proficiency and understanding in a discipline or profession, can be defined as “teaching”.

I wouldn't. You are still asking the reader to "hold that thought" while you tediously expound. I'd say it would be a style error not to simply move the predicate.

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Thank you so much for your help and clarification. This makes things so much easier for me. Thanks a lot