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Mark Brader filted:
... but his Italian is actually flawless. To my ear ... II's. (John Paul's II? Or no "s" at all...? Uh.)

In informal use you can attach 's to the end of pretty much any phrase used as a noun, so ... thing, or they'd find it ugly; but if you did say it, and got the inflection right, people would understand.

Doesn't that lead to things like "the Queen of England's hat"?...r
Is it just me, or did I hear, during the announcements, Latin being pronounced as though it were Italian? For ... pronunciation of Latin by the church? (Surely a lot of Catholics speak languages with no /tS/?) *very noticeable in "decimi"

It is the usual ecclesiastical pronunciation. Personally, I find restored pronunciation horrible. Pope Benedict XVI uses the ecclesiastical pronunciation, of course, but closing long vowels and opening short vowels: I've noticed he almost says (di:um) for "Deum". He also says (kv) instead of (kw), but I don't think this is a choice.
Bye, FB

"I saw something nasty in the woodshed!"
(Cold Comfort Farm, the film)
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Fancy meeting you here.
Benedict XVI speaks both Latin and Italian with a marked German accent, but his Italian is actually flawless. To my ear and understanding, more so than John Paul II's. (John Paul's II? Or no "s" at all...? Uh.)

Basically, he knows the Italian language better, having lived here for a lot of time.
In the last few days I've marveled at how some cardinals who don't live in Italy can speak Italian very well.
Bye, FB

Domanda: "Era il figlio di Iside e Osiride".
Risposta: "Thor".
(quiz televisivo)
Am I the only person who has become suprised by the new Pope? He never speaks Italian in public, only ... he speaks German and English, and being a Doctor in Theology he has a proper Classical Greek too. But Italian?

He always speaks Italian. Of course, he's delivered his first homily in Latin, as is tradition. Actually, he knows Italian very well, though he retains some peculiarities, such as (kv) instead of (kw), and (tS) instead of (dZ).
Bye, FB

"The doctors found out that Bunbury could not live, that is what I mean—so Bunbury died."
"He seems to have had great confidence in the opinion of his physicians." ("The Importance of Being Earnest", Oscar Wilde)
may well have said "/detsimi:/" as a jugend:

I have a record of Catulli Carmina

I'd say /k&'tu:li: kA:'mi:[email protected]/. Never heard of it though.

By Karl Orff, a musical setting of some of the poet's stuff; not as famous as Carmina Burana , but. Alzo the Germanic pronunciation was appropriate. Qvi zedens identidem te. CDB
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Alan Jones put finger to keyboard in this fashion:
Skitt put finger to keyboard in this fashion: I have heard Latin c pronounced as ts in choral works recorded in Eastern Europe.

It's standard in the German-speaking countries, and British (and US?) singers often use it for e.g. Mozart and Haydn settings of the Mass: "excelsis" become "ex-tsel-siss" where official RC Church Latin has something like "egg-shell-seece".

Egg-shell-seece is exactly what we sing in an Anglican cathedral. It's my perception that sung Latin has moved towards Italian pronunciation during my choral career over the last 35 years.

David
==
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The present school of thought would have it that Caesar stood upand yelled "Wenny widdy wicky!"...historically accurate, maybe, but it just don't seem right..r

You must consult 1066 And All That , in which it's conclusively shown that Caesar was successfully applying the previously unknown principles of psychological warfare: on hearing the invader describe them as "weeny, weedy, and weaky", the Britons lost all stomach for the fight.

Mike.
may well have said "/detsimi:/" as a jugend: I'd say /k&'tu:li: kA:'mi:[email protected]/. Never heard of it though.

By Karl Orff, a musical setting of some of the poet's stuff; not as famous as Carmina Burana ,

That one I have heard of :-) /bju'rA:[email protected]/ (though I think I've heard some Brits say it with /[email protected]/ as well)
but. Alzo the Germanic pronunciation
was appropriate. Qvi zedens identidem te. CDB

I'd never considered that Germans might say /kvi:/, which to me is a lot harder to pronounce than /kwi:/.
Vale amice
Edmund
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I'd never considered that Germans might say /kvi:/, which to me is a lot harder to pronounce than /kwi:/.

In German words is /kv/.

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
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