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Alan Jones put finger to keyboard in this fashion:

It's standard in the German-speaking countries, and British (andUS?) singers ... "ex-tsel-siss" where official RC Church Latin has something like "egg-shell-seece".

Egg-shell-seece is exactly what we sing in an Anglican cathedral. It's my perception that sung Latin has moved towards Italian pronunciation during my choral career over the last 35 years.

Thanks for that reminder- one Christmas carol (Ding dong merrily is it?) has that word in it, which most people here do sing as something like /Iks tSel sIs/
Edmund
My dad was taught a different pronunciation than the one I was taught (both of us in Latvian schools). His Latin "c" (in the 1920s) was a "ts", mine (ca. 1948) was a "k".

If it were not for that "different than" I might say then that you had a master who was a refugee from Rugby. Pun, you know.

The English public school used to employ the hard K in dealing with a Latin C. Dunno what they do now. Their products seem not to speak English properly, let alone Kikeronian rhetoric.
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Did you mean /e/ or /E/?
When I've not been able to avoid Christmas carols, I've only heard it as /Ek sEl sIs/, with the initial vowel possibly being realised as (I). But my experience is unlikely to be representative (except by coincidence).

Andrew Gwilliam
To email me, replace "bottomless pit" with "silverhelm"
Could well have been for all I know. (That was the first conclave of my lifetime, so wouldn't have had many chances to notice before). My

Why not? It's not only in conclaves, it's in all spoken Latin in the Vatican and in Catholic liturgies. Mike Hardy
Am I the only person who has become suprised by the new Pope? He never speaks Italian in public, only Latin.

His initial speech to the public was in Italian. I saw it live on TV. The cardinal who introduced him addressed the crowd first in Italian, then in Spanish, then in French, then in English, then in German. Then he read the actual announcement in Latin, pronouncing it as if it were modern Italian, of course.

Mike Hardy
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taught "ts", mine US?) Mass: Thanks for that reminder- one ... most people here do sing assomething like /Iks tSel sIs/

Did you mean /e/ or /E/?

I've never been quite sure which the majority British pronunciation is. I think I might actually have /E/ in "bed" etc. I wouldn't dispute if you your transcribed my "****lsis" with /E/, put it that way. If it's the initial sound you mean, I hear it as /I/ more often than /e/ or /E/. Granted I only usually hear the word around Christmas time.
Edmund
Mike Lyle filted:

Unless my Latin is completely even more completely screwed up than I'm already admitting, that first one should at best be "weany", pronounced "waynee"...I can see why he'd want to liken the enemy to infants; can't imagine what would prompt a comparison to the people of Vienna..r
It sounds as if you were taught the traditional British pronunciation of Latin. From what I have read, this was ... character expresses distaste at the "Wenny weedy weeky" pronunciation of "Veni, vidi, vici" that he is being told to teach.

Distaste? That's a bit of an understatement. I think he almost gets himself fired over I guess that and the insistence on the hard 'c' everywhere. In fact, isn't that why he only gets to be headmaster in his old age when there's a war on?

"Throw me that lipstick, darling, I wanna redo my stigmata."

+-Jennifer Saunders, "Absolutely Fabulous"
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Could well have been for all I know. (That was the first conclaveof my lifetime, so wouldn't have had many chances to notice before). My

Why not? It's not only in conclaves, it's in all spoken Latin in the Vatican and in Catholic liturgies. Mike Hardy

Because I almost never go to church (only if invited to a wedding or similar), and have never been to Rome? :-)
I learnt what Latin I know at school, not church.
I had 2 Latin teachers, the first was an old chap born I'd guess in the 1920s, who wasn't into any of this "V is pronounced W" stuff, and used RP-type diphthongs for Latin 'o' and 'e'. He was far more concerned that we get our grammar right (reciting declensions etc) than speak like Julius Caesar :-)
The 2nd was a woman about 30 years younger, who used the /w/ and also used Italian-like vowel sounds, but never /tS/ for 'c'. Both IIRC used /aI/ for 'ae' and neither used it for 'i'
Edmund
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