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By Karl Orff, a musical setting of some of the poet's stuff; not as famous as Carmina Burana , but. Alzo the Germanic pronunciation was appropriate. Qvi zedens identidem te. CDB

That's Carl Orff; not to be confused with Boris, nor with the firm of solicitors Curl Orf and Die.
Matti
By Karl Orff, a musical setting of some of the poet's stuff; not as famous as Carmina Burana ,

That one I have heard of :-) /bju'rA:[email protected]/ (though I think I've heard some Brits say it with /[email protected]/ as well)

Burana seems to signify 'from the Benediktbeuren' so neither is particularly 'correct'. My (Br) pronunciation is /bU'rA:[email protected]/ (I think, being no expert in this ASCII or any other IPA).

Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
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The present school of thought would have it that Caesar stood up andyelled "Wenny widdy wicky!"...historically accurate, maybe.

Maybe not. Suetonius says only that the famous phrase was seen on a sign carried during the parade that formed part of Caesar's triumph. At the time (and quite in contrast with the usual rhythm imparted to the phrase by native English-speakers), all six vowels were long: /we:ni: vi:di: wi:ki:/.
The present school of thought would have it that Caesar stood up and yelled "Wenny widdy wicky!"...historically accurate, maybe.

Maybe not. Suetonius says only that the famous phrase was seen on a sign carried during the parade that formed part of Caesar's triumph. At

the time (and quite in contrast with the usual rhythm imparted to the phrase by native English-speakers), all six vowels were long: /we:ni: wi:di: wi:ki:/.
The present school of thought would have it that Caesar stood up and yelled "Wenny widdy wicky!"...historically accurate, maybe.

Maybe not. Suetonius says only that the famous phrase was seen on a sign carried during the parade that formed ... contrast with the usual rhythm imparted to the phrase by native English-speakers), all six vowels were long: /we:ni: wi:di: wi:ki:/.

I thought that horrid little chap from the Clockwork Orange was going to come and do something about your viddies, but you saw the danger in time.
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Edmund Lewis filted:

I think it was; there is an older pronunciation still ... to the days when school was taught in Latin even?)

Well, of course it is! How do you think they ever came up with such gems of wit as "Caesar adsum jam forte, Brutus aderat", if they didn't pronounce it as if it were modern Anglais?
The present school of thought would have it that Caesar stood up andyelled "Wenny widdy wicky!"...historically accurate, maybe, but it justdon't seem right..r

If it's any comfort, I think it's likely the "V" wasn't exactly like a modern English /w/. After all, it's found written as "B" in Pompeiian graffitos. Probably some sort of weird hybrid of /w/, /B/, and /v/. The Poles might know.
JP 2.

Sounds like a sequel. Actually, it sounds like an obscure reference to my old landlord.

Well, the world has the perfect sequel to JP 2, not that anyone was surprised by the choice: a new JP without the charm, but equally regressive. The only saving grace is that he's an old guy, so there remains a slim chance I'll see a pope who will welcome women priests and homosexuals into the Church. A decent pope would lift the ban on birth control, as well. I fear, however, the new guy won't get anything right. While here, he will serve to bring more discrimination and unhappiness into the world, but he'll sort out the dogma, if wrong. Very important, that.
Charles Riggs
There are no accented letters in my email address.
Is it just me, or did I hear, during the announcements, Latin being pronounced as though it were Italian? For ... newuniversal pronunciation of Latin by the church? (Surely a lot of Catholicsspeak languages with no /tS/?) *very noticeable in "decimi"

What? Lord! Doncha know the history of it all?
Latin spelling is base on the pronunciation of the first century BC(E); as with English, the pronunciation changed, but the spelling remained the same. This became increasingly confusing round about the 500s or so, when a lot of the words, as well as the pronunciation, had changed.
But even up to the 700s people, well, literate people, anyway; literate people in Romance speaking areas still considered written Latin to be the written form of the local spoken language. So they pronounced the written Latin according to the pronunciation of the local population, or at least as best they could. It would be as if we were to pronounce Chaucer according to modern English pronunciation: "wan that April with his shore's soot, the drought of March has pursed to the root" , thus losing not only the rhythm, but much of the sense, of the original.

But the proto-English, the Anglo-Saxons, having never spoken Latin in the first place, took the primitive approach of sounding it out letter by letter, and found themselves having to translate the whole thing into their own tongue to make any sense at all out of it. By the late 700s even the Franks realized something was up and had the gall to import some Brit called Albert or Alfred or something to straighten it all out, as they thought. It was about then they realized they was Frogs.
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To complicate things even further, the English pronunciation of Latin went through the Great Vowel Shift along with English. So if "cave" (Latin for "beware") was pronounced something like "KAH-veh" by the English before the GVS, it would be pronounced something like "KAY-vee" afterwards.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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