Am I the only person who has become suprised by the new Pope? He never speaks Italian in public, only Latin.
Doesn't he speak a proper Italian, or is it a conscious way of showing that the Roman Church is /universal/, not Italian? Of course, being an old German university professor, he speaks German and English, and being a Doctor in Theology he has a proper Classical Greek too. But Italian?
Per Erik Rønne
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Am I the only person who has become suprised by the new Pope? He never speaks Italian in public, only ... he speaks German and English, and being a Doctor in Theology he has a proper Classical Greek too. But Italian?

Afair, the first words he said as Pope to the general public were in Italian.
Adrian
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Am I the only person who has become suprised by the new Pope? He never speaks Italian in public, only ... he speaks German and English, and being a Doctor in Theology he has a proper Classical Greek too. But Italian?

The sermon he preached at the last Pope's funeral was in Italian.

Matthew Huntbach
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Am I the only person who has become suprised by ... Theology he has a proper Classical Greek too. But Italian?

Afair, the first words he said as Pope to the general public were in Italian.

Just to give confirmation, from Italy, by a native speaker... he's addressed the public a few times by now, both officially and unofficially, as it were (he's been round to his old apartment to say bye to the neighbours and of course a crowd gathered) and always in Italian. I don't know where Per got his impression from; it may be because Benedict XVI speaks both Latin and Italian with a marked German accent, but his Italian is actually flawless. To my ear and understanding, more so than John Paul II's. (John Paul's II? Or no "s" at all...? Uh.)
Cheers,

Isa
Work like you don't need money,
Love like you've never been hurt,
And dance like no one's watching
http://web.tiscali.it/alfabeto auschwitz/index.htm
Am I the only person who has become suprised by the new Pope? Henever speaks Italian in public, only Latin. ... German and English, andbeing a Doctor in Theology he has a proper Classical Greek too. ButItalian? Per Erik R=F8nne

Is it just me, or did I hear, during the announcements, Latin being pronounced as though it were Italian? For instance with /tS/*, as /e/ or /i/ (which confused people as to which case was being used), and a few more examples? Is this used as a kind of new universal pronunciation of Latin by the church? (Surely a lot of Catholics speak languages with no /tS/?)
*very noticeable in "decimi"
Edmund
This is entirely standard in Vatican Latin, and I think it's fairly commonplace in "Church Latin" (if there's such a beast).

Andrew Gwilliam
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Is it just me, or did I hear, during the announcements, Latin being pronounced as though it were Italian? For ... kind of new universal pronunciation of Latin by the church? (Surely a lot of Catholics speak languages with no /tS/?)

Hasn't Latin been pronounced by the RCCh with modern Italianate pronunciation standards for the past few centuries?

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Is it just me, or did I hear, during the ... church? (Surely a lot of Catholicsspeak languages with no /tS/?)

Hasn't Latin been pronounced by the RCCh with modern Italianate pronunciation standards for the past few centuries?

Could well have been for all I know. (That was the first conclave of my lifetime, so wouldn't have had many chances to notice before). My experience of Latin (at school in the UK) is that "decimi" would be either /dekImi:/ or /desImi:/; "decem" always /dekem/, and /ae/ usually /aI/.
Edmund
/tS/*, universal speak

Hasn't Latin been pronounced by the RCCh with modern Italianate pronunciation standards for the past few centuries?

Could well have been for all I know. (That was the first conclave of my lifetime, so wouldn't have had ... school in the UK) is that "decimi" would be either /dekImi:/ or /desImi:/; "decem" always /dekem/, and /ae/ usually /aI/.

Back when Latin was the learned language of Europe, each country pronounced it as if it were the local language. That's how you get "/desImi:/" (originally "/desimai/"?) in England and "/de:tSimi:/" in Italian. The Rattweiller may well have said "/detsimi:/" as a jugend: I have a record of Catulli Carmina sung by a German choir in their national accent. And of course "/dekimi:/" is Kikero's version
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