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In the phrase 'the Position of Director of Academic Advising' Why is there not an article (the, or a) in front of Director? I thought the word 'director' is a count noun, it should be always preceeded by an article. Does this has to do with the case of the first letter? The phrase ' the position of director of academic advising' conveys the same meaning as the first phrase?

Does a phrase such as 'the job of a gardener' or 'the job of gardener' exist?

I have seen many cases where after 'of', the count noun is not preceeded by an article. Thank you for your help.
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ChariotWhy is there not an article (the, or a) in front of Director?
Because it's a title.
ChariotDoes a phrase such as 'the job of a gardener' or 'the job of gardener' exist?
Yes. Both are possible.

The job of a gardener is sometimes difficult. (the work done by any gardener you might wish to consider)
We still have an opening for the job of gardener. (the job position with the title "gardener")

CJ
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Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Thanks a lot. The title words can either begin with a capital letter or a lower case letter?
ChariotThanks a lot. The title words can either begin with a capital letter or a lower case letter?

Yes. Professional positions in corporations or in academia or government are the ones that usually take the capitals.

CJ