+1
Howdy,

Here're two sentences from a video about Playstation 3, one is played after another:

1) No matter what TV you are using...
2) No matter what video cables you use...

Why on Earth is there the present continuous in the first one and right after it the present simple in the other one? Such sentences only add to my confusion... The present simple is used when a habit or routine is involved... and the present continuous when something happens right now, at the time of speaking...

Thanks,
+1
One possible reason is that you're assumed to have already decided which TV to use (or to have no choice), but the choice of video cables is still open or is more flexible. In other words, "using" means "already using", while "use" has at least half an eye on the future.
+0
anglista2008Sorry, but I don't get it... What if I said "use" in both sentences or what if I said "using" in both of them? There has to be a grammar rule for that Emotion: wink
I don't think so. In either case you cite the meaning would not change substantially. It's just one of those inexplicable oddities of language. Mr. Wordy has given you as good an explaination as you are likely to get.

Sure, I could wax philosophical for several paragraphs about the subtle differences in each combination of words but the bottom line is it's largely irrelevant to the meaning and has more to do with the mental viewpoint of the writer that any strict rule of grammar.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
Thanks,

Sorry, but I don't get it... What if I said "use" in both sentences or what if I said "using" in both of them? There has to be a grammar rule for that Emotion: wink
 RayH's reply was promoted to an answer.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.