Have you witnessed examples of the present perfect being collocated with definite past-time temporal adverbials in your variant of English? If so, do you think it suggests a growing trend in the way the present perfect will be used in the future.

e.g.

He's done that last year.

(See Absract.)

Yes; no.

MrP
MrPedanticYes; no.

MrP

Why "no"?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I haven't noticed this other than in sentences in which I presume that the speaker changed their mind about what they were saying mid sentence.
richard_sI haven't noticed this other than in sentences in which I presume that the speaker changed their mind about what they were saying mid sentence.
I see. Do you think this, supposed, emergent use is only happening to the Kiwis?
Anonymous
Why "no"?

Because I have seen no evidence to suggest that it might.

MrP
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I guess it must be if you attest to that fact.  It's interesting that it hasn't made it across the Tasman though.  
richard_sI guess it must be if you attest to that fact. It's interesting that it hasn't made it across the Tasman though.

The article above claims that it has.

'However, examples of this “preterite perfect” (PrP) phenomenon (He’s done that last year) have
been observed in American, British, Australian and New Zealand English."


Here's more:

"A corpus of nearly 1600 past-time narrative verbs was created based on data

from a police reality television show where the PrP was frequently observed.

Transcripts of the show were tagged for discourse and other contextual features in

order to discover the most favourable contexts for PrP use. Analysis of the corpus

reveals that the PrP is able not only to collocate with past-time adverbials, but also to

be used as a narrative past tense, a use previously only reported in Australian English

(Engel and Ritz 2000)."

From the above article.
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