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Hello, everyone. I learned from my grammar book that we often use present tense to refer to future in "in case-clause". Like:

I always take an umbrella in case it rains.

I've bought a chicken in case your mother stays to lunch.

In those cases, I found that all the verbs in main clauses are tenses refer to "present". But what if they are "past tense"? I saw several examples in my grammar books:

1. I wrote down her address in case I should forget it. (What change should I make with the "forget" if I don't use "should" in this example?)

2. We took our swimming suits in case we should find a pool. (What change should I make with the "find" if I don't use "should" in this example?)

3. He left early in case he should miss the last train. (What change should I make with the "miss" if I don't use "should" in this example?)

4. In case the wall should collapse, they evacuated the building. (What change should I make with the "evacuate" if I don't use "should" in this example?)

I think, for those cases, we should use "past tense" in those cases even though the main clause has a past verb. Because I saw this sentences in another book:

5. Doctors and nerses remained above ground while police patrolled the streets in case anyone tried to leave the shelters too soon.(I think the "tried" can be replaced by "should try", am I right?)

Please tell me if I can use present tense in those occations. Thank you very much.
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ViceidolBut what if they are "past tense"?
Then make the in case clause in the past also, or with should, as you've shown. For example,
We took our swimming suits in case we found a pool.
ViceidolI think the "tried" can be replaced by "should try", am I right?)
Yes.
Viceidoltell me if I can use present tense
Not sure whether this is another question. You can certainly use whichever tense is appropriate to what you want to say. The should pattern fits with either present or past.

Police are patrolling the streets in case anyone [tries / should try] to leave too soon.
CJ
Comments  
Thank you, Jim. I completely understand now. (I was trying to say "past tense" in my last question, but I guess I've so messed up with these tense problems that I eventually typed something I don't want.)