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Do we use THE before "said person" or "said thing" I think there should always be a "the" before "said anything" but because I read so many people just use "said anything" with out the article "the" , I am confused!

Person A: It's cold outside, you'll get sick, dumbo!
Person B: This line only works if said person is not wearing a jacket or some warm clothing!

Shouldn't it be" If THE said person is not wearing ....."

Thanks!
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Said person means the aforementioned person (the person named or mentioned previously, or I suppose, that you were just speaking about). It is not often heard in conversational English. It is used in legal documents or sometimes in sarcastic speech. It is the shortened form of "aforesaid" and operates as an adjective in that usage. Perhaps because, by definition, it is known who you are referring to, it doesn't need an article because it's operating as if it were taking the place of the person's name. At least that's how it works in legal documents; I'm not sure I follow the use in your example.
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KJinCali79 I'm not sure I follow the use in your example.
You are not alone. It doesn't work. There is no 'said person'.
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fivejedjon KJinCali79 I'm not sure I follow the use in your example.You are not alone. It doesn't work. There is no 'said person'.


I have no clue, some body please help me out Emotion: sad
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With or without the definite article, 'said person' does not work in your sentence.
DibI have no clue, some body please help me out
Person A: It's cold outside, you'll get sick, dumbo!
Person B: This line only works if said person is not wearing a jacket or some warm clothing!

Meaning:

Person B: This line only works if the person we already referred to is not wearing a jacket or some warm clothing.

This doesn't work because there is no person that A and B have already referred to within this dialog.

If you think that there is such a person in the form of "you" (you'll get sick), then let me say that the referent of this "you" is unclear. Two possibilities immediately come to mind.

Person B refers to "this line" as if everything Person A just said is merely an example of something that could be said; therefore, "you" would refer to someone unknown, vague, and general, outside the scope of this dialog. That certainly can't count as a person already referred to.

If, however, Person A is addressing B directly, then "you" is B, and "said person" won't work at all because B would, in this case, say ... if I am not wearing a jacket ... because "said person" can't be used to refer to oneself.

So in neither of these two cases does it make sense to think of "you" as the person already referred to.

But except for "you", there is no other candidate for the person already referred to, so the reference "said person" is floating in space, referring to nothing.

CJ