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Hello,

Could you check these sentences, please?

He tells us something interesting every day.
He is told something interesting every day.
I often send letters to my friends.
I often send letters my friends.(I think this one is wrong)
I often send my friends letters.
I am often sent to the South.
I always compliment my friends.
I am always complimented (at) home.
Every Saturday, my father is shown my grades.
Every Saturday, my father shows my grades to my grandfather.
Every Saturday, my father shows my grandfather my grades.
We often remember you.

Is it better to use: 'every saturday,' 'often', etc at the end of a sentence?

Thanks
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Hi,

Could you check these sentences, please? Almost perfect. Emotion: smile

He tells us something interesting every day.
He is told something interesting every day.
I often send letters to my friends.
I often send letters my friends.(I think this one is wrong) It is.

II often send my friends letters.
I am often sent to the South.
I always compliment my friends.
I am always complimented at home.
Every Saturday, my father is shown my grades.
Every Saturday, my father shows my grades to my grandfather.
Every Saturday, my father shows my grandfather my grades.
We often remember you.

Is it better to use: 'every Saturday,' 'often', etc at the end of a sentence? No.

And 'often' is usually not placed at the end.

Clive
Comments  
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Sometimes 'at' is omitted before 'home', sometimes it is not. I can't always trust my intuition. There must be a rule, I think. Am I right?

Thanks
Hi,

I tend to think of it as just idiomatic.

Here are some phases where 'at' is commonly omitted.
go home
come home
stay home
call home

Can you think of more?

Clive
Hmmm, what about these examples?

When he called me I was (at) home.
I am always (at) home on Sundays.
He came to my place at 6pm and by that time I had already been (at) home.
Hello! Is anyone (at) home?
I am (at) home at last!

Thanks
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Hi,

what about these examples?

When he called me I was (at) home.
I am always (at) home on Sundays.

He came to my place at 6pm and by that time I had already been (at) home.
"At" does not fit here.
'I had already been home' implies that I was no longer home at the time of speaking.

Hello! Is anyone (at) home?

I am (at) home at last! Omit 'at'.

Clive