+0
The film's name originally referred to a stolen diamond. However, it wasn't long before the signature pink cat that slunk across the screen in the opening credits came to be known as the Pink Panther.

How do you paraphrase the phrase in bold, especially the word signature? Thanks.
Comments  
Hi,

The film's name originally referred to a stolen diamond. However, it wasn't long before the signature pink cat that slunk across the screen in the opening credits came to be known as the Pink Panther.

How do you paraphrase the phrase in bold, especially the word signature? Just as I think of 'you' every time I see your signature, I think of that movie every time I see that pink cat. The phrase also suggests that the pink cat is, in a sense, a signature or reminder placed in the movie by the director, Blake Edwards, to make us think of him when we see it..

Best wishes, Clive
CliveHi,

The film's name originally referred to a stolen diamond. However, it wasn't long before the signature pink cat that slunk across the screen in the opening credits came to be known as the Pink Panther.

How do you paraphrase the phrase in bold, especially the word signature? Just as I think of 'you' every time I see your signature, I think of that movie every time I see that pink cat. The phrase also suggests that the pink cat is, in a sense, a signature or reminder placed in the movie by the director, Blake Edwards, to make us think of him when we see it..

Best wishes, Clive

Thanks, Clive, for the clear-cut and beneficial explanation.

I get it now.

I presume in our language we'd name it "the trademark/logo pink cat," but I'm not sure if that makes sense to you.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hi,

I presume in our language we'd name it "the trademark/logo pink cat," but I'm not sure if that makes sense to you.

In English, these terms are not suitable here.

trademark - a legally protected ientifier for a business

logo - a design, often abstract, that identifies a business and its products.

Both would normally be 'non-moving' identifiers, unlike the pink cat.

Best wishes, Clive
Thanks, Clive, for your kindness and time.

A whimsical idea just crossed my mind, that is, is it possible that trademark and logo are synonymous? They are in our language.
Hi,

In English, a trademark can be a logo or in the form of words. I think the main distinction is that a trademark has legal force. In other words, if you use my trademark I can sue you and I will win.

Clive
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
CliveHi,

In English, a trademark can be a logo or in the form of words. I think the main distinction is that a trademark has legal force. In other words, if you use my trademark I can sue you and I will win.

Clive

Thanks, Clive, for your help.

I get it now.