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"Ich m=FC=DF dieses tun" =3D I must do this "Ich habe meine Arbeit zu tun" =3D "I have my work to do". EXCATLY the same.

No, not exactly the same. German has additional rules, such as that the infinitive must come at the end of the clause, possibly followed by the main verb if this is a subordinate clause; the verb in the main clause comes second, except in a question, where it is first, etc.

"Ich mu=DF dieses tun." =3D "I must this do."
(I've forgotten some German: should the "dieses" not be "dies"? I know the umlaut was wrong, though.)
=20
Stefano
On 25 Oct 2006, Reader wrote snip twaddle You're pissing ... refuses to accept that, even though it's a self-evident truth.

Are you actually going to tell me you don't see the parallel? German and English are not "completely differnt" (sic). They share many features derived from a common ancestor. Chinese and English, on the other hand, are "completely different".

There are differences beyond just spelling words differently.
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"mu=DF"

Of course. I had =FCml=E4=FCtitis.
By the way, the modern spelling is "muss".

Well, yeah, but there's still some usage of the =DF
On 25 Oct 2006, Reader wrote snip twaddle You're pissing ... refuses to accept that, even though it's a self-evident truth.

Are you actually going to tell me you don't see the parallel? German and English are not "completely differnt" (sic). They share many features derived from a common ancestor. Chinese and English, on the other hand, are "completely different".

If you went back to Germany, split infinitives would no longer bother you and you could speak your native language comfortably instead of struggling with English.

Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
Are you actually going to tell me you don't see ... Chinese and English, on the other hand, are "completely different".

If you went back to Germany, split infinitives would no longer bother you and you could speak your native language comfortably instead of struggling with English.

Du mu=DFt vernichtet werden!
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If you went back to Germany, split infinitives would no ... speak your native language comfortably instead of struggling with English.

Du mußt vernichtet werden!

Yes, that's it. See how much easier it is for you than dealing with the complexities of a language that is not your native tongue?

Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
Du mu=DFt vernichtet werden!

Yes, that's it. See how much easier it is for you than dealing with the complexities of a language that is not your native tongue?

Tee hee.
No. It's very different. It's a completely different language, with completely differnt rules of grammar and usage.

The use of modals without the preposition, and the infinitive with the proposition, is exactly the same. I just gave ... I must do this "Ich habe meine Arbeit zu tun" = "I have my work to do". EXACTLY the same.

Well, if you carefully choose the example, and you acknowledge that every word is spelled differently (and in your example, some are spelled incorrectly), the word order is different, it's in a completely
different language, and that you have created your own personal definition, spelling, and capitalization for "exactly," yes, there is a vague kind of similarity.
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"Awkward avoidance"? Who says that is necessary? Vocabulary is key! ... modals). "Ich müß dieses tun" = I must do this

Don't look now, but there's and unwarranted umlaut about.

EXCATLY like English!
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