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<the spurious eminence of the pop celebrity>

What would you make of the above phrase as it is withut any further context? Why is the eminence spurious, what is the reason for this spuriousness, eminence or celebrity?

Please help me.
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<the spurious eminence of the pop celebrity>

I take it as referring to the phenomenon of the class, not any particular individual.

It's probably just jealousy talking.

Some people who feel they have worked hard to earn their eminence in other fields may believe that the pop celebrities have not.

what is the reason for this spuriousness, eminence or celebrity? Neither.

I think that in your quote, "eminence" is a quality, but "celebrity" is a person. Do you mean to switch definitions? (and call "celebrity" a quality?)
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Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
AvangiI think that in your quote, "eminence" is a quality, but "celebrity" is a person. Do you mean to switch definitions? (and call "celebrity" a quality?)
Thanks, Avangi.

'eminence' is false because the celebrity, perhaps, hasn't worked that much as compared to other individuals from some different field such as academic class, assuming hard work is the main criterion to gauge the 'true' eminence. So, I think the celebrity could be accused of spurious eminence in that respect. The celebrity is the reason. Do I make any sense?

By the way, is this possible to switch the definitions? I doubt it.

Regards
Jack
Jackson6612The celebrity is the reason. Do I make any sense?
Yes, you're probably right.
I shouldn't have dragged my feet on it.

The noun "celebrity" is both countable and uncountable. The countable celebrity is a person. The uncountable celebrity is the quality of being celebrated which attaches to that person.

Your legend, "The spurious eminence of the pop celebrity," sounds like a thesis, but a thesis with an axe to grind. (that is, un-objective) It describes a phenomenon - a particular type of prominent person. So, in your phrase, "celebrity" is countable.
But in your analysis, "the celebrity is the reason," it's uncountable, if I understand your meaning. So we're talking about the celebrity of the celebrity. Is the celebrity the reason that some people call this celebrity's eminence spurious? (Not all eminent people are celebrated.)
My objection was that you shouldn't switch meanings without giving us some preparation - especially in this sort of forum, where we sometimes struggle with ambiguities. Emotion: smile

Yes, it's possible to switch, but give us a warning. You might even use the double meaning to your advantage.

- A.