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Hi,

I've got this sentence:

"This is necessary to provide the research with a reliable data-base explaining the structure of the socio-economic system",

but Ms Google says that the phrase "the structure of the socio-economic system" is not really used (only 8 hits, mostly from non-native speakers).
However, I do get millions of hits for both "the structure of the economic system " and "the structure of the social system ".

Is there a way to combine the two without making the phrase odd?
(I'm also unsure about that "explaining")

Many thanks.
Emotion: smile
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Te Random House Dictionary sees nothing odd in the word:

so·ci·o·ec·o·nom·ic, adj.
of, pertaining to, or signifying the combination or interaction of social and economic factors: socioeconomic study; socioeconomic status.


There's no hyphen in the dictionary, though. The same word is used in other languages as well. Of course it is spelled and pronounced somewhat differently.

CB
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Hi CB,

Thanks for pointing out the spelling thing! I think it comes from my native language, where we write "socio-economico" or "socio-economica" (depending on whether the adjective qualifies a masculine or feminine noun ... plural forms are also possible).

Actually, I was concerned about the phrase "structure of the socioeconomic system" and was wondering if the phrase makes any sense in English. As nobody raised their eyebrows, may I assume it is fine (once removed the hiphen) and understandable?

Thank you again. Emotion: smile
Hi Tanit

It all boils down to whether the structure of a system is correct. I have no idea how natural it is to native ears or how common it is, but I certainly see nothing wrong with it.

CB
Cool Breeze I certainly see nothing wrong with it.
... and that's more than enough for me. Emotion: smile

Thank you again.
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