1 2 3 4 5
Sometimes they were made with water that was almost too hot to dip one's finger in.

ROFL!

Thanks, Daniel. My tongue was in cheek, as usual, but I've seen quite a few American movies where "Will you have some tea?" or "Do you prefer tea?" or an equivalent was asked, both in period pieces and modern stuff. Unlike David, I've never even asked for tea in an American restaurant, because years ago coffee in such places was usually much better than its equivalent in English ones, and you got free refills.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
"Tea of an afternoon" is not American at all. "Five ... not allowing conversation that wasn't about the work), we did.

Cece, there are things in life other than work, thank goodness. I've had cups of 'tea' in America on several ... tea in tea bags. Sometimes they were made with water that was almost too hot to dip one's finger in.

I have had near tea loose tea in a perforated metal holder, steeped in water that had been boiling but was removed from the heat just before the tea was put in. What is it that y'all do to coffee that I've heard such bad things about it?
Still, we do not have a meal called "tea." Not afternoon tea, not high tea. We have breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Those who sleep late may have brunch instead of having separate breakfast and lunch. Those who have a cookie or two, or a candy bar, in mid-afternoon, or at bedtime, have a snack.
Cece
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I have had near tea loose tea in a perforated metal holder, steeped in water that had been boiling ... tea was put in. What is it that y'all do to coffee that I've heard such bad things about it?

Oh! One should pour the boiling water on to the tea. One does not put the tea - whether bag or infuser - into the container of boiled water. No wonder it was only "near tea". (The infuser is not a good idea anyway; it infinitesimally reduces the temperature of the boiling water before the infusing begins. Or so some say.)
We in the UK are a bit better at coffee now, I think - certainly much fussier, with many types of ground coffee, and some beans, readily available vacuum-packed in any supermarket. Do Americans still use percolators? I've never cared for coffee made that way. I grind the beans (in a proper grinder, not a whirling chopper) and use either a filter or a cafetière, unless people want espresso. Coffee in the various kinds of coffee-shop is not usually, to my mind, strong enough or made from a blend with a powerful enough aroma: Costa seems the most successful chain in supplying what I like.
Alan Jones
I have had near tea loose tea in a ... to coffee that I've heard such bad things about it?

Oh! One should pour the boiling water on to the tea. One does not put the tea - whether ... good idea anyway; it infinitesimally reduces the temperature of the boiling water before the infusing begins. Or so some say.)

We pour tea into the boiling water in the tea kettle. And this has been a traditional practice where I live. Mind, we rarely use tea bags. Instead, we put teaspoonfuls of tea granules into the boiling water. If we desire strong tea as we call it , we let it boil for a few seconds more after adding tea into the kettle. I have been making tea this way since I learned to make it.

Ayaz Ahmed Khan
Yours Forever in, > Webmaster,
Cyberspace. > http://adic.netfirms.com/fastce/home.html
Oh! One should pour the boiling water on ... boiling water before the infusing begins. Or so some say.)

We pour tea into the boiling water in the tea kettle. And this has been a traditional practice where I ... more after adding tea into the kettle. I have been making tea this way since I learned to make it.

Granules?! But tea comes as little dried leaves, either loose or in a bag. Is yours some sort of instant tea? And you boil it? My mind has suddenly been expanded.
Alan Jones
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
We pour tea into the boiling water in the tea ... making tea this way since I learned to make it.

Granules?! But tea comes as little dried leaves, either loose or in a bag. Is yours some sort of instant tea? And you boil it? My mind has suddenly been expanded.

Oh, maybe granule isn't the right word. Tea does come as little dried leaves. But it's crushed into very small and fragile pieces which look like granules tiny pieces if you pour it in a transparent jar, such as one for keeping tea, and look at it from above.
And, yes, I boil it. Let me explain the procedure again. I leave the water inside the kettle to boil. When steam starts to emerge from the spout, I open the lid of the kettle, drop one teaspoonful of tea in it assuming I have to make one cup of hot tea , close the lid, and pick up the kettle after roughly five or ten seconds. If, however, I want to drink strong tea, I let the kettle boil after having put the tea in it for an extra ten to twenty seconds.

That's it. Of course, I use a filter when pouring tea from the kettle into the glass to separate the liquid from the residue. This filter is much like a tablespoon, only with a bigger shallow bowl that looks like a concave wire gauze made of fine, thin wire for filtering tiny pieces.
I hope it's clear now. Tried my best. How do you, by the way, make tea?

Ayaz Ahmed Khan
Yours Forever in, > Webmaster,
Cyberspace. > http://adic.netfirms.com/fastce/home.html
(On the making of tea)
Ayaz Ahmed Khan:
Granules?! But tea comes as little dried leaves, either loose ... And you boil it? My mind has suddenly been expanded.AAK:

Oh, maybe granule isn't the right word. Tea does come as little dried leaves. But it's crushed into very small ... for filtering tiny pieces. I hope it's clear now. Tried my best. How do you, by the way, make tea?[/nq]The water is boiled in a kettle used for no purpose other than heating plain water. The tea pot is a separate thing, usually made of pottery with a loose lid. As the water in the kettle gets hot, a little of it is poured into the pot and swirled around, and then emptied out: this ensures that the pot is hot before the tea is made (to be honest I usually omit this step).. The dried tea is placed in the tea pot, either loose ("a spoonful per person and one for the pot", the saying goes, but I think that's far too much) or in the form of tea-bags, or perhaps as loose tea enclosed in a sort of small perforated metal box on a chain.

The tea pot is taken to the kettle (another saying: "Take the pot to the kettle, never the kettle to the pot") and the boiling water poured on to the tea. The pot l;id is replaced and the tea left for a few minutes to "draw". Then, if necessary using a sieve just as you describe it, the tea is poured into the cup and sugar and milk added if liked. Some people, including me, often put the milk in the cup first, but others regard that as a vulgar procedure.
Just one further point - about these "granules". That sounds like the "crumbs" which are one of the forms of instant coffee, not small leaves. Anyway, tea leaves may be quite big and recognisable as the leaves of a plant, especially the most expensive kinds intended to be used as loose tea.

Alan Jones
Then, if necessary using a sieve just as you describe it, the tea is poured into the cup and sugar and milk added if liked. Some people, including me, often put the milk in the cup first, but others regard that as a vulgar procedure.

It is sacrilege to put the milk in last. Any good cook knows - hot into cold.
Putting a small amount of milk into very hot tea scalds the milk and changes its taste.
My mother could always tell the difference, nomatter how many times I tested her.
m.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Oh, maybe granule isn't the right word. Tea does come as little dried leaves. But it's crushed into very small ... if you pour it in a transparent jar, such as one for keeping tea, and look at it from above.

I think the word you're looking for is "flakes". To me among the terms for fragments of material "granule" implies an irregular but roughly ellipsoidal shape, while dried leaves like tea break into pieces that remain fairly flat in appearance (unless they've been "ground" or "powdered", not usually done with 'real' tea, rather than just "crushed").

Odysseus
Show more